How CEOs Benefit from Executive Coaching for Leadership



Almost two-thirds of CEOs don’t receive executive coaching or leadership development counsel — even though they admit it’d be a good idea if they did.

That’s according to a 2013 study.

It was conducted by the Center for Leadership Development and Research at Stanford Graduate School of Business, Stanford University’s Rock Center for Corporate Governance, and The Miles Group.

“What’s interesting is that nearly 100 percent of CEOs in the survey responded that they actually enjoy the process of receiving coaching and leadership advice, so there is real opportunity for companies to fill in that gap,” saysStanford Professor David F. Larcker, who led the research.

“Given how vitally important it is for the CEO to be getting the best possible counsel, independent of their board, in order to maintain the health of the corporation, it’s concerning that so many of them are ‘going it alone,’” says Stephen Miles, CEO of The Miles Group.

“Even the best-of-the-best CEOs have their blind spots and can dramatically improve their performance with an outside perspective weighing in,” adds Mr. Miles.

More than 200 CEOS, board directors and senior managers at North American public and private companies were surveyed.

Mergers & AcquisitionsStudy’s key findings:

— Nearly 66 percent don’t receive coaching or leadership advice from outside participants.

— Fully 100 percent said they’re open to such coaching.

— Almost 80 percent of directors believe their CEOS would like coaching.

— Among CEOs receiving such input, 78 percent said it was their idea, and 21 percent said the board chairman made the suggestion.

— Over 60 percent of CEOs said the status of their coaching is treated confidentially and about 33 percent said the status is given to the board.

— Managing conflict skills is ranked the No. concern by 43 percent of the CEOs.

— Board members said they want their CEOs to receive “mentoring skills/developing internal talent” and “sharing leadership/delegation skills.”

— The CEOs’ preference for coaching: sharing leadership/delegation, conflict management, team building, and mentoring.

— CEOs disdain sharing leadership/delegation, conflict management, team building, and mentoring.

Solutions

Being a CEO means facing loneliness at the top. CEOS must be discrete and have few people in whom to confide.

My sense is that many of the surveyed CEOs are uncomfortable with exploring their self-awareness, a prerequisite for true leadership.

Until CEOs better understand their personal capacities, they won’t be able to fully understand, manage and inspire their personnel.

So coaching would help CEOs become better leaders.

The solution: An approach that’s reminiscent of a personal SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis.

CEOs would benefit from the following approach:

1. Evaluate your career and personal events

Examine what and when were the pivotal points in your career and personal life. List your attitude, behavior and values.

Assess the return on your investment in energy. List the benefits and the negative outcomes.

2. Conduct an inventory of your strengths and weaknesses

Create two vertical columns on sheets of paper. On the left, list your strengths. On the other, list your weaknesses.

A strength is often a weakness and vice versa. It’s up to you to determine the difference. If you’re too aggressive at times as a weakness, when is it possible to describe it as being assertive as a strength?

An example:

If in a meeting I were to pound my fist on the table to make a point that would be aggressive. But if I were to give some thought and think about how to give a persuasive response — not a reaction — then I would  be assertive.

3. Use the inventory to develop goals

This is the simplest part. List goals to fill those gaps — your weaknesses — that hold you back from optimal leadership.

Create a timeline for action and how you’ll get to where to need to go for success.

When you succeed, implement this training process for your employees. You’ll be very pleased with the strong results.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related resources:

Thought Leadership — Why Companies Hire Management Consultants — Companies want knowledge. A good idea can be worth $1 million and more. That’s why companies hire thought leaders. It’s also why you see many consultants position themselves as thought leaders and give away free information in how-to articles or studies, which lead to books, seminars and being quoted in the media.

Leadership: How Leaders Employ 11 Strengths to Grow Businesses — Ascension to the C-suite doesn’t automatically qualify an executive as a leader. Leaders have 11 strengths that enable them to manage their companies for greater effectiveness and elasticity despite a fast-changing marketplace. Having positive attributes is synonymous with having skill sets. Strong attributes are certainly helpful. But more importantly, possessing qualities or strengths connotes having values.

Management — 4 Mindsets for Leadership in Performance Reviews — Are you nervous at the thought of giving employee-performance reviews? You’re not alone. Your employees aren’t exactly thrilled, either. Typically, employees aren’t convinced they can get valid feedback. If they’ve experienced poor managers, they likely dread the performance-review process or are skeptical of the outcome.

Why Not to Expect Miraculous Leadership from Narcissistic CEOs — “Do you believe in miracles? Yes!” -Al Michaels, sportscaster  That’s the line sportscaster Mr. Michaels made famous on Feb. 22, 1980 in “The Miracle on Ice,” a famous hockey game in the Olympic Winter Games.

18 Leadership Strategies to Earn Employee Respect — Eighteen strategies to profit from good labor relations, and to leverage the perspective of employees – your company’s human capital.

If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.

-John Quincy Adams


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




Executives Succeed by Avoiding 7 Missteps



“Employees tend to rise to their level of incompetence.”

-The Peter Principle



Why do some executives fail and others succeed?

Successful executives have a purpose. They learn from their mistakes and those of others. They strive to learn good judgment, stay focused and pursue their objectives with abandon.

Conversely, ineffective executives fail with seven possible missteps:

ambro exec1. They fail to understand the big picture. As a result, they don’t have a vision for growth and where they must lead their employees.

They’re focused on the past or only what’s at the end of their noses, which also means they fail to plan strategically and make effective decisions.

Moral: It’s important to understand the marketplace and to envision how the company can best flourish.

2. They’re negative personalities. They focus on problems not solutions.

By focusing on a problem, it grows into a nightmare.

Further, they fail to see why their peers succeed despite adversity.

Moral: Positive people know that for every challenge, there’s a silver lining and there are numerous solutions.

3. They start each day unproductively. They don’t practice good daily habits. Their routine is chaotic. They react to events  – expecting drudgery and having to put out fires instead of planning, focusing on value and seeking enjoyment in what’s important in life.

Moral: Each day must start on a positive note. Look for reasons to be optimistic, appreciate your family and friends, get exercise and recreation, study and learn, and follow current events. Look for opportunities for growth, personally and professionally.

 4. They build empires. For egotistical reasons, they scheme to stockpile power and clout. They want all the glory and credit. They inhibit the abilities of their employees. In business failures, they point fingers of blame at others.

Moral: For success, the ego must be kept in check. Get to know your staff. Partner with your employees. Empower them. Encourage them to provide profitable ideas. Find out what’s important to them.

5. They retain or hire ineffective employees, and fail to build teams. Their practices stem from the wrong motives. They want to hear the word “yes” to boost their egos  instead of what they need to hear. They’re not objective in human resources for the welfare of the organization.

Moral: If you want a team to propel your success and that of your organization, use best HR practices.

6. They fail in internal communication. By failing to communicate, they’re impervious to water-cooler gossip. Rumors spread, employee morale suffers and the team members aren’t motivated.

Moral: For enhanced communication and an upbeat workforce, it’s best to be assertive and stay on the offensive. Prevent the spread of erroneous information at the earliest hint of trouble.

7. They fail to be trustworthy and discreet. They don’t give any thought to sensitive information and how it should be handled. Nor do they have a sense of good timing. They simply don’t care about the feelings of others.

Moral: To be respected and to keep employees happy, executives must know what and when information should be made public.

From the Coach’s Corner, related content:

Vision in Setting Goals with 8 Best Practices — Whatever your entrepreneurial dreams, focusing on the right details is a skill conducive for setting goals strategically. However, if management doesn’t ponder enough on action-oriented details, goals are inordinately difficult to achieve.

9 Dos and Don’ts for Best Decision-makingThe dos and don’ts for best decision-making are applicable in three ways: Whether you have difficulty making the best decisions, engage in self doubt after making one, or are gun shy because some of your decisions have failed you.

Trust Gap between Managers and Workers — How to Drive Engagement — While it’s true there are companies that are aware that good morale among employees propels profits, many businesses are missing opportunities for growth. It’s not because of marketing. It has to do with internal issues.

Profit Drivers – How and Why to Partner with YourEmployees — If you want maximum profit, consider partnering with your employees. “Key employees – in fact, all employees – will be more valuable to a company if they understand what drives profit and improves cash flow for the business,” says leading financial consultant Roni Fischer.

Secrets in Motivating Employees to Offer Profitable Ideas — Savvy employers know how to profit from their human capital. Such knowledge is a powerful weapon for high performance in a competitive marketplace. Furthermore, there’s a correlation among excellent sales, happy customers, and high employee morale.

“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There’s no point in being a damn fool about it.”

-W. C. Fields


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy of Ambro at www.freedigitalphotos.net

What Successful Marketers Know About Lead Generation



Professional marketers are more successful when they use integrated marketing automation to evaluate their performance and to become more competitive in the marketplace.

This means they’re more sophisticated than their competitors in determining their returns on investments, according to a 2012 study.

“Overall, the research found that companies taking a holistic approach to leveraging integrated marketing automation to drive effectiveness have increased key business and financial outcomes,” according to the report.

The “Lead Generation Marketing Effectiveness Study” was conducted by the Lenskold Group in tandem with The Pedowitz Group, pedowitzgroup.com, in Manasquan, NJ.

It reveals how integrated marketing automation, strengths in core competencies, and using ROI metrics affect lead generation and stimulate marketing success.

Debbie Qaqish


“This report provides key insights into the specific drivers that enable marketing automation to impact effectiveness and efficiency,” says Debbie Qaqish, principal and chief revenue marketing officer of Pedowitz Group.

“Best practice companies are reaching a strategic level of support, reinforcing the need for CMOs to begin or continue their revenue marketing transformation,” she explains.

My sense is that she’s right, as CMOs often have difficulty gaining support from CEOs who often see marketing as an expense vis-à-vis an investment. When profits decrease, CEOs usually cut budgets for marketing.

That’s a mistake in my view.  (A secret to success in a weak economy is to expand marketing.)

By successfully documenting a marketing ROI, a CMO’s relationship with the CEO will improve.

Then, it will be easier for a CMO to use the four keys to market ideas to the CEO.

“The survey results show that marketing executives focusing their organization on the key business outcomes and creating the environment to deliver will get much more value from their marketing automation,” says Jim Lenskold, President of Lenskold Group.

“There is great potential to improve marketing impact on sales, revenue and ROI when marketing automation generates greater alignment with sales, better measurement insights into lead outcomes and the ability to continuously improve both effectiveness and efficiency,” he adds.

“Overall, the research found that companies taking a holistic approach to leveraging integrated marketing automation to drive effectiveness have increased key business and financial outcomes.”

Key findings:

  • Marketing automation users that also use ROI metrics to assess effectiveness are much more likely to realize an increase in “total marketing revenue contribution” from their automation (69 percent compared to just 19 percent of marketers using only traditional, non-financial metrics).
  • The best practice group of “highly effective and efficient” marketers is more likely to attain a strategic level of marketing support from their automation, with CMO support and sales team integration (46 percent vs. 19 percent of all others).
  • Highly effective and efficient organizations are much more likely to report strengths in proactively managing the marketing funnel, measuring incremental sales and revenue, providing a pipeline forecast and being accountable for revenue goals. The differences were quite significant, averaging 70 percent for highly effective and efficient marketers vs. 30 percent of all other marketers.
  • Lead generation marketing effectiveness increases with marketing automation. Marketers report an increase in six key outcomes as a result of implementing marketing automation, with 6 in 10 reporting increased quantity and quality of leads and close to half reporting increases in the “percent of leads accepted by sales and the total marketing revenue contribution.”

Respondents were drawn from a worldwide sample of 373 lead generation marketers.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related strategies:

Marketing Checklist to Measure Your Brand’s Personality — Here are two key questions about your marketing: 1. How much have you invested in your brand and personality? 2. How’s it working? These are important questions. However, many companies – large, medium and small – can’t accurately answer the questions.

Profits: How and Why to Align Marketing with Sales — If marketing isn’t synchronized with sales, a company doesn’t enjoy optimized profits. So why is it so many companies don’t align their marketing with sales? Here is how and why to align marketing with sales for higher profits.

Why it’s Never Too Early to Plan for Q4 E-commerce — It’s never to early to get ready ASAP for Q4 online sales. Why? A study of e-commerce discloses some secrets you might need to know. MerchantTribe.com reports shoppers are buying more items daily in the holiday shopping season, but the size of the typical order soon decreases significantly.

9 Tips to Evaluate Online Advertising Options — Are you at a point at which you want to advertise your company on the Internet? But you’re unsure which sites are the best for you? The options are endless and can be confusing. The last thing you want to do is to market a product or service that doesn’t reach the right people.

“Marketing takes a day to learn. Unfortunately it takes a lifetime to master.”
– Phil Kolter


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




In a Slump? 11 Tips to Succeed in the Dog Days of Summer



Some businesspeople struggle to succeed in summer months. It’s as though they’re in a slump.

It’s the hottest and most humid time of the year in many regions. Business seems to stagnate as the weather becomes hotter and sultrier.

Perhaps you can relate. Have you and your team been slumping? Have you lost motivation?

If so, you probably need a break, and fear a sluggish start to Q4. Yes, it will be here before you know it.

Here are things you can do to break out of your slump:

1. Consider the big picture.

Write down what success means to you. What does it look like? Envision your success.

2. Assuming you’ve written goals for this year, review them.

Hint: If you don’t have written goals, that’s part of your problem. Are your goals realistic? What’s changed? Are your goals relevant to the situation you’re in now?

3. Evaluate what you want to achieve by the end of the year.

Focus on solutions, not the problems. Start doing the necessary footwork. Tackle the most difficult task each morning. This will help to prevent feeling overwhelmed. (See: Business Success Checklist to Work Smarter, Not Harder)

4. Review your mental and physical health.

Do you need a physical? Start an exercise program, if only for long walks. Your exercise program might need to include pushing away from the table to avoid extra helpings or dessert. Changing your exercise program often means stop jumping to conclusions about trivial matters or threatening issues.

Consider a new thought response: “No matter what there are no big deals; no matter what.”

5. Check your cash flow.

Review what’s working and what isn’t. Stop procrastinating on financial decisions. If your cash flow is poor, you feel poor because you can’t pay the bills nor can you use money for what you’d like to do. Your image can also suffer with vendors or with customers, if you don’t manage your cash flow. You can creatively manage your cash flow in seven ways.

6. Remove all stress factors to the best of your ability.

This usually includes getting rid of all clutter. Make sure work spaces are clean and organized. You have a 35 percent better chance of living longer if you feel happy. That’s the upshot from a 2011 British study that links feelings of happiness to longevity. So the emphasis is on feelings. Makes sense, right? (See: 24 Tips to Reduce Stress, Work Happier for Top Performance.)

7. Spend more time listening to your employees.

While it’s true there are companies that are aware that good morale among employees propels profits, many businesses are missing opportunities for growth. It’s not because of marketing. It has to do with internal issues. Why? There’s still a wide gap between what managers and workers think about trust, according to a study. (See: Profit Drivers – How and Why to Partner with Your Employees)

8. Devote more attention to your personal life.

That includes your significant other, family, friends and pet. Read a good book, and spend time enjoying your forgotten hobbies to clear your thoughts. And focus on having an attitude of gratitude. Many businesspeople focus too much on the 10 percent that’s not working instead of celebrating the 90 percent that is working.

9. Practice the principle of contrary action.

Change your routine in all that you do. For example, drive to work using a different route. When you go grocery shopping, steer the cart down a different aisle than you normally do. This will help you to become more open-minded, and you’ll more readily spot opportunities for growth.

10. Plan a break whether it’s for a week or a long weekend.

Get the help you need so you can disappear from work. You can’t afford not to take a break.

11. Volunteer some time to help a charity or someone less fortunate than you are.

Believe me, there opportunities everywhere. You’ll feel better and will have an extra spring in your step.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related tips:

For the Best Cash Flow, Manage Your Inventory Costs with 8 Tips — With proper inventory management, you can lower your expenses and increase your cash flow. For many businesses, that means taking a look at your inventory costs. When your products aren’t selling, obviously, it hurts. Products just lurking and collecting dust in your warehouse are costing you money.

Four Tips to Motivate Employees When You’re Facing Adversity — Effective bosses have antennas to alert them over looming challenges. If they don’t have such an antenna, it’s important for them to develop one for multiple credibility reasons. Even the bosses of small companies can suffer from image problems externally and internally. Either one or both will adversely affect profits.

“Slump? I ain’t in no slump… I just ain’t hitting.
-Yogi Berra


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is also a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




Solutions If You Want to Rise to the Top in Innovation


Every company wants to be successful. But to achieve lofty goals, certainly innovation is the key.

To become an innovative leader and to participate in turbo-charging the economy, it’s vital to continually evaluate your organization and strategize for success.

It takes involvement by members of your entire operation. That means identifying your company’s assets, processes, resources and skills.

In a nutshell, you must analyze six elements:

— your human resources

— products and services

— marketing

— operations

— financial performance

— competition

Human Resources

Completely review your capabilities in human resources with a focus on your competencies and weaknesses. Determine your abilities to achieve a competitive advantage.

Consider your recruitment process, training and development, and compensation systems.

Assess the strengths and weaknesses of your organizational culture, and your leadership capabilities.

If your company is lacking in teamwork, morale is poor and profits are weak, chances are you need to change your organization’s culture. Be forewarned, changing a culture is a monumental chore because it will take strategic planning and super powers of persuasion because six steps are necessary to implement a cultural change for profits.

Products and services

Evaluate your offerings in terms of breadth and mix, quality and reliability.

Marketing

Take a hard look at your image, research, development, distribution channels, brand equity, sales personnel, customer-service quotient and market share.

Query your customers. What are their viewpoints? Evaluate your customer base to see if they meet your goals for growth. s time for an assessment of your marketing and sales culture. Why?

Superior cultures drive business performance. Specifically, two key elements of culture – innovation and responsiveness – have a direct impact on your company’s sales success.

Examine your potential marketplace with a focus on socio-culture – demographic trends and tastes, economic trends from interest rates to inflation.

Operations

Evaluate your productivity, quality controls, facilities, supply chain, technology, information systems, and management strengths and weaknesses.

Financial performance

Keep an eye on profitability. Make sure you avoid pricing mistakes. Forecast your revenue growth. Assess your asset utilization, debt-leverage position, liquidity and equity position.

Competition

Compare the missions, strategies, and competitive advantages of the competitors. 

Following your analysis, there are six steps to take:

1. Using your analysis, develop a big-picture strategic action plan.

2. Make sure you have a comprehensive human resources program that encourages collaboration among teams. That means maximum delegation, empowerment, training and succession planning.

3. Encourage blue sky planning sessions.

4. Continually evolve. Leverage the insights of your devil advocates with an eye on your company’s potential. Ask the right open-ended questions for optimal creativity.

5. Practice the “Principle of Contrary Action.” To learn how to keep an open mind, keep a mental note of all your activities but use a different approach each time. For example, even when driving to the neighborhood store, take a different route to-and-from each trip and alter your shopping habits inside the store. Dare to be bold. Consider all alternatives.

6. Keep chipping away. Don’t give up.

Conclusion

Hopefully, you can avoid the arduous task of changing your culture in order to innovate. Follow the above tactics, an you’ll become a Ninja innovator. Good luck!

From the Coach’s Corner, editor’s picks:

Why Innovation Isn’t Working at 82% of Surveyed Companies — When you make a major investment in innovation, you want a good return on your investment, right? Well, hundreds of senior executives admit to disappointment over their innovation efforts despite making increased investments, according to an Accenture report.

Developing Trends, and Solutions for Manufacturing Success — U.S. manufacturers are getting a reminder about how to be successful – it’s important to evaluate whether they have the human capital, processes, equipment and strategic plans for success. That’s the result of a 32-page study released in 2011 by the Wisconsin Manufacturing Extension Partnership (WMEP).

Study: Why Lean Manufacturing Principles Often Don’t WorkMany businesses love cutting waste and costs for profits by using lean manufacturing principles, but many global manufacturers have failed. The companies used the popular Six Sigma, Kaizen and Value Stream Mapping. All of this was reported in a 2011 study by the consulting firm, AlixPartners in New York. 

Home-Grown Succession Planning Helps Financial Performance — Companies that promote their chief executives from inside vis-à-vis recruiting from the outside have a much higher financial-success rate. In other words, successful companies identify and nurture their intellectual capital. It’s not just my experience. It’s been confirmed by a global human resources study.

11 Management Strategies for a Successful Turnaround — When it comes to management strategies for a successful turnaround, a quote by financial-world wizard Warren Buffett is apropos.  “Risk comes from not knowing what you’re doing,” Mr. Buffett said. My response: “Touché.” It’s all about capital mobility created by effective management.

“When planning for a year, plant corn. When planning for a decade, plant trees. When planning for life, train and educate people.”

-Chinese proverb


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




Seeing the Big Picture: An Often-Overlooked Trait for Sustainable Competitiveness



Sports can be a great metaphor for business. So occasionally I enjoy hearing broadcast analysts explain why they believe some teams are victorious.

Some even become dynasties while others fail. Often the analysts’ conclusions are applicable for business. 

ID-100198726 bankruptcy law medical billsIt’s also sometimes true that neither businesspeople nor sport analysts don’t understand the big picture when it comes to sustainable competitiveness. 

In analyzing successes and defeats, the announcers might stress teamwork, playmaking, good defense, offense, or whatever.

That’s all true. I agree.

Likewise, a lot of businesses don’t dominate even though they have good sales or marketing people. 

But in analyzing sustainable competitiveness, it goes deeper than that – much deeper. 

Before I explain what I mean, let’s consider your company.

How do you measure up, metrically? 

Try taking this simple quiz: 

  1. Does your company operate at a high level of performance? 
  2. Do you have big or small opportunities for significant improvement? 
  3. Does your business use its resources effectively? 
  4. Does your firm have a strong commitment to performance measurement? 
  5. How’s your strategic planning for all tsunami-like contingencies? 
  6. Are you best-in-class in your niche? 
  7. How high is your customer-satisfaction index? 
  8. How is your employee morale? 
  9. How advanced are you in doing the green thing? 
  10. Do you give back, or partner with the community? 

If you have positive answers for the 10 questions, it’s a safe bet your company has sustainable competitiveness – as a result of your bench strength from succession planning. 

Sure, just like sports teams, a typical successful business has superior game plans. It’s also faster and stronger than its competitors. 

But what’s an overlooked trait for sustainable competitiveness – the common denominator? Winners are No. 1 in bench strength from succession planning. Now that’s stellar management. 

From the Coach’s Corner, here are strategies for succession planning: 

Home-Grown Succession Planning Helps Financial Performance — Companies that promote their chief executives from inside vis-à-vis recruiting from the outside have a much higher financial-success rate. In other words, successful companies identify and nurture their intellectual capital. It’s not just my experience. It’s been confirmed by a global human resources study.

Management — Big Banks Provide Lessons in Succession Planning — Many businesspeople are so focused on operating their businesses, they forget about human capital –their most important asset. Organizations from small to large should strategically make a succession plan.

Remove Guesswork for Promoting Talent within Your Business — Baseball as a metaphor for winning in business — promoting the right employees   To win baseball championships, there’s often a correlation — among  a baseball team’s management, talent and farm system. A farm system’s role is to provide training and experience for young players. The best farm systems deliver impact talent.

“I have always advocated for funding and programs that increase our productivity and competitiveness.”

George Allen

 

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




Photo courtesy of arztsamui at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.