You Can Be a Popular Speaker with the Power of Touch



Effective public speakers know the power of physical touch, says a leading expert in how to improve communication with others, public speaking and performance.

“In my humble view, there is never enough attention given to the formidable power of tactile connection,” asserts Eric Stone.

Mr. Stone is a former New York City stage and television actor, operates Speakers and Artists International, Inc. (www.publicspeakingconnection.com) in Beverly Hills, Calif.

woman glasses b&wThat’s right. He suggests speakers learn the art of physical touch.

“It assuredly dates back to our tribal heritage where constant contact was the only way to trust and thrive,” he explains.

“We trust what we can see and touch before anything else,” adds Mr. Stone.

“Politicians understand this so well and so should anyone interested in better communication and public speaking,” he points out.

He says “the act of touching solidifies your game.” 

The speaking expert provides examples of typical ways to touch.

They include:

— Shake hands with someone before you go on stage or before you begin your speech.

— Mingle by touching.

— Do the same at meetings. Make a point of holding your gaze as you touch someone’s arm or elbow and make eye contact.

— Touch objects such as furniture, a glass of water, the podium, etc., anything that belongs to the physical world.

“Spots objects in the room. See them physically not just as the mental awareness that they are there,” he explains. “It establishes your presence and grounds you.”

Mr. Stone says “it brings us back to natural living and anchors our performances and communication.”

He says touching helps you bond with your audience.

“Gravity, balance, breathing and tactile relatedness are your best allies when things signal that something could go wrong,” he adds.

“Feel the weight of your body, breathe deeply several times consciously and get on a mission to touch and hold,” he advises. “Remember: the mind can only project mental pictures and it should only operate in the background at the service of your physical self.”

From the Coach’s Corner, here are more public speaking tips:

Success in Public Speaking Stems from Being Natural…Here’s How — Ever notice how some public speakers perform flawlessly? How they seem to be authentic, natural speakers? Our thought processes prevent us from becoming natural speakers, says Eric Stone, a leading expert in how to improve communication with others, public speaking and performance.

Maximize Your Speaking with the Power of Pauses — Have you ever noticed why some people succeed as powerful public speakers? One salient reason is they know how to use the power of pauses.  “Along with rooted passion and deliberate enthusiasm, pauses are the true launching pads of any great verbal impact,” says Eric Stone, a leading expert in communication with others.

Communication – You Can Train Yourself to Stop Stressing — It’s OK to be nervous before giving a speech or when you’re entering an important round of negotiations. Feeling pressure is one thing but allowing it to morph into stress and tension is another. When you allow this to happen, in a sense, you’re giving away your personal power, which inhibits your performance.

Public Speaking Tips – for Speeches in Accepting Awards, Honors — So you’re about to be honored for your pro bono work, volunteerism, or for creating a foundation to fund scholarships for education. But you get stage fright or don’t know how to most-effectively frame your acceptance speech? Join the crowd. A lot of people have difficulty in public speaking.

How to Get More Opportunities as a Guest Speaker — If you’re successful in generating speaking opportunities, you’ll create opportunities for your career. At the least, you’ll be in a position to raise your business profile. Ideally, prospective clients or customers will be in the audience. Count on opportunities to develop centers of influence — people who can refer business to you.

9 Tips to Connect with People after You Make Your Speech — Typically, in making a speech at a public forum, businesspeople hope to get a return on their investment. After all, giving a great speech or serving on a panel before a targeted audience necessitates your valuable time and effort in preparation.

“A good speech should be like a woman’s skirt; long enough to cover the subject and short enough to create interest.” 

-Winston S. Churchill

 __________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is also a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please  contact Terry.

Success in Public Speaking Stems from Being Natural…Here’s How



Ever notice how some public speakers perform flawlessly?

How they seem to be authentic, natural speakers?

Our thought processes prevent us from becoming natural speakers, says Eric Stone, a leading expert in how to improve communication with others, public speaking and performance.

ID-10083079 posterize

Mr. Stone says being a natural speaker is difficult “because we are so identified and attached to the endless gymnastics of the mental plane.”

In other words, Mr. Stone says we’re distracted by our thoughts.

“Any time of the day, our minds are technically ‘on fire’ plotting the next chapter of our lives or putting out the fires from yesterday or yesterdays; or still, measuring this or that in reference to what we should have done, could have done, will do, etc.,” he explains.

Mr. Stone, a former New York City stage and television actor, operates Speakers and Artists International, Inc. in Beverly Hills, Calif.

His Web site is www.publicspeakingconnection.com.

He provides five insights to becoming a natural speaker:

The mind is always so busy thinking, comparing, and assessing that being natural and relaxed gets lost and takes a back seat.

There’s no break from that it seems; and yet there are people who make it into a practice, even a way of life such as athletes, musicians, dancers, actors, performers and in the business world as well.

Our best and effortless experiences in life occur when it is the mind that takes the back seat. In my view, the difference between being and thinking is listening, and listening comes from watching with our internal body rhythm as opposed to judging or evaluating with our thoughts.

Even when we listen to music we are watching or contemplating imagery, which evokes feelings and sensations. These feelings are part of our internal rhythm and very far from thinking. Therefore, ease of being comes from the physical body. It is not a mental process.

Confusion arises because we trust our thoughts way before we trust our bodies (breath, senses, intuition, feelings, instincts, touch, etc.). When we begin to pay attention to the body, internal rhythms naturally emerges.

For instance, the weight of your body on a chair or standing, your heart beating, the flow of your breath going in and out, sensations such as warmth, applying yourself to a task, sport, activity, etc.

Inhabiting our natural rhythm is a simple task. It requires a change of allegiance from our thoughts to our inner rhythm.  I have called it “body-time experiencing.”

Body-time has a different quality or atmosphere, which seems to render everything effortless and transparent, all anchored and rooted in physical sensations not mental activity.

When we allow the physical realm to anchor our thinking process, we start noticing major improvements that make a real difference with everyone and everything we touch, professionally and personally.

In my professional and personal experience, over-thinking and the speed of the mind is like an addiction.

From the Coach’s Corner, more public-speaking tips:

Maximize Your Speaking with the Power of Pauses — Have you ever noticed why some people succeed as powerful public speakers? One salient reason is they know how to use the power of pauses.

Public Speaking Tips – for Speeches in Accepting Awards, Honors — So you’re about to be honored for your pro bono work, volunteerism, or for creating a foundation to fund scholarships for education. But you get stage fright or don’t know how to most-effectively frame your acceptance speech? Join the crowd. A lot of people have difficulty in public speaking.

To Give a Great Speech, 9 Tips to Manage Your Nervousness – If you get nervous even at the thought of giving a speech, join the crowd. You’re not alone. Many people get nervous because they fear criticism, embarrassment, failure and/or rejection. But if you learn to manage your nervousness, you can give great speeches. Here are nine tips.

Learn to Give a Speech Like a Business Pro with 8 Tips – When it’s time to give a speech, do you tremble with abject fear? Do you break out in a cold sweat? Getting terrified and tongue-tied is not a fun experience. It’s OK to be nervous before giving a speech in public or speaking in a meeting at work.

7 Steps to Become Great at Thinking on Your Feet – Have you ever been at a loss for words? For example, when asked a question, have you been tongue tied in a sales presentation, while speaking at an event, in negotiations, during an interview or a staff meeting? Getting tongue-tied is not a fun experience.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t — you’re right.”
-Henry Ford


 __________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is also a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy of Posterize at www.freedigitalphotos.net

To Give a Great Speech, 9 Tips to Manage Your Nervousness



If you get nervous even at the thought of giving a speech, join the crowd. You’re not alone. Many people get nervous because they fear criticism, embarrassment, failure and/or rejection.

Every person is different but physical symptoms from anxiety and fear are common.

Nervous symptoms include: An unsettled stomach, fainting, perspiring, shortness of breath, stuttering, tense muscles and more.

However, fear can be a great motivator, if it’s managed. Use nervousness to your advantage and don’t assume anything or take anything for granted.

“In boxing, I had a lot of fear. Fear was good. But, for the first time, in the bout with Muhammad Ali, I didn’t have any fear. I thought, ‘This is easy. This is what I’ve been waiting for’. No fear at all. No nervousness. And I lost,” George Foreman later admitted.

In other words, nervousness can become your ally.

But as the boxer said, complacency isn’t. It always prevents you from giving a great performance.

The key is to become skilled at not acting afraid.

You can learn how to act confident — your audience wants to believe you have something important to share and will assume you’re calm and composed.

To manage your nervousness, here’s a checklist:

1. Research and prepare three ways

— Know your subject. Don’t wait to prepare your speech. Start immediately. If you procrastinate, you’re guaranteed to fail.

— Know your audience. Craft a speech to discuss what’s important to members of the audience.

On the day of your event, arrive early. Circulate among the attendees and talk with some of them. You’ll likely to make friends. It’ll put you at ease. Maintain eye contact with your new friends during your talk for increased confidence.

— Know your venue and environment. There are additional reasons to arrive early for a smooth performance. Check out the equipment. Learn the schedule of events sandwiched around your speech. Be sure to learn whether the attendees will be eating dinner as you speak.

2. Practice

Rehearse your speech while standing in front of a mirror to see how you present yourself. It will help your confidence.

If possible, videotape your rehearsal and critique yourself. Until you get confident in giving speeches, keep doing it again and again. On second thought, videotape your speeches even after you become proficient.

3. Put a governor on your adrenalin rush

First impressions set the tone on how the audience will perceive you. You’re still likely to be nervous, but don’t let it harm your performance. So take steps to make sure you start your speech successfully — thoroughly memorize your opening remarks so well that you don’t stumble or stammer.

Use nervousness to your advantage and don’t assume anything or take anything for granted.

4. Use visualization techniques

Success results from an inside job. If you take steps to feel successful — really feel confident — the audience will feel it, too. Therefore, enhance your potential for success by visualizing your success. Imagine how you’ll speak with confidence and how the audience will love your presentation.

5. Write and use affirmations

One sure way to reduce your fear and negativity is to write statements — affirmations — about how good you want to be. But write in present tense, such as “I’m a dynamic speaker,” or I’m very persuasive.”

Put the list in a handy location. Stand in front of a mirror and read the list aloud. Keep repeating the process.

6. Just before your speech, breathe deeply and get some exercise

Many good speakers will work out before a major presentation. At the venue, they’ll take a walk or do some light stretching.

Even after decades of public speaking, another of my favorites is to find a quiet place and meditate. Another is to breathe deeply. Fill your lungs with air, hold it for a few seconds, and do it several times.

7. Remember human nature

Because you’ve been invited to speak, the audience believes you’re a guru so act like it. The attendees are there because they want to see a successful speech. They won’t know if you make a mistake, so act like you’re successful.

8. Be an attraction — smile

Even if you’re nervous, put a smile on your face. Fake it, if you must, until you make it. A smile will calm your nerves and your attendees will respond favorably.

9. Act as if…

Your audience members will judge you how you look, not how you feel. By virtue of you being at the podium or on the stage, the attendees will automatically assume you’re confident and skilled.

Unless you’re totally inept as a speaker, even a subpar performance will be viewed as a success. So act as if you’re a competent speaker.

From the Coach’s Corner, related tips:

How to Get More Opportunities as a Guest Speaker — If you’re successful in generating speaking opportunities, you’ll create opportunities for your career. At the least, you’ll be in a position to raise your business profile.

9 Tips to Connect with People after You Make Your Speech — Typically, in making a speech at a public forum, businesspeople hope to get a return on their investment. After all, giving a great speech or serving on a panel before a targeted audience necessitates your valuable time and effort in preparation.

How to Obtain the Most Profit from Speaking Opportunities — It’s one thing to be invited to speak at your industry’s major event. But it’s another to create the right impression for your hosts, your audience and prospective customers or clients. There’s more to it than you might think.

Public Speaking Tips – for Speeches in Accepting Awards, Honors — So you’re about to be honored for your pro bono work, volunteerism, or for creating a foundation to fund scholarships for education. But you get stage fright or don’t know how to most-effectively frame your acceptance speech?

Strategies to Use When Your Business Presentation Goes Badly — You know your subject and how to get the people in the audience to connect emotionally with your pitch. You leverage the latest technology. Audience members might not recall everything you say. However, they’ll always recall how you make them feel.

“If I ever completely lost my nervousness I would be frightened half to death.”

Paul Lynde


 __________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.






Maximize Your Speaking with the Power of Pauses



Have you ever noticed why some people succeed as powerful public speakers? One salient reason is they know how to use the power of pauses.
 

“Along with rooted passion and deliberate enthusiasm, pauses are the true launching pads of any great verbal impact,” says Eric Stone, a leading expert in how to improve communication with others, public speaking and performance. “A great actor or politician is amazingly gifted at pauses.”

ID-10046950 AmbroSo, why is it that many people continue speaking nonstop instead of pausing when they want to emphasize important points? 

“Strangely, pausing makes most people highly uncomfortable and feeling exposed,” says Mr. Stone. “When we pause, we suddenly sense the pressure to be interesting or good and we fear that if we do not rush to speak we’ll look unprofessional, stupid or worse that we’ll die.”

Mr. Stone, a former New York City stage and television actor, operates Speakers and Artists International, Inc. (www.publicspeakingconnection.com) in Beverly Hills, Calif.

“Paradoxically, pausing places the much-needed attention on us,” he explains. “It is the raison d’être of a pause to make you look and sound good.”

When you speak, Mr. Stone says people in your audience will focus on four things in this order:

  1. Facial expressions
  2. Voice tone
  3. Gestures
  4. Postures

“When you pause, all four elements are magnified and amplified,” he adds. “Rather than welcoming the attention, most people ironically flee this immediate yet necessary promotion to star status.”                            

As an example, he cites one of the great classical composers.

“It is the pauses that create rhythm not elocution or melody,” he asserts.” Mozart also said it ‘Music is not in the notes, but in the silence between.’”

In speaking, Mr. Stone says your technique “shines as a consequence of well-planned pauses not elocution and the quality of ideas alone.”

His recommendations on practicing the art of pause:

  1. By deliberately intending to pause.
  2. Pause twice as long as you speak, you’ll be amazed at the results.
  3. By welcoming the intensity of focused energy that will inevitably come at you when you pause.
  4. By allowing yourself to plant firmly in your body and breathing so that you can use the energy of your pauses to impact your listeners effectively.
  5. By watching what happens when you pause if you ever wondered how people are taking in your message. They can only listen to you and digest or reflect when you pause.
  6. Think of each idea spoken as a bite within a course. Your communication or presentation may have one course or ten. If you metaphorically throw all the food at them in one sitting, no wonder they get angry or utterly confused.

From the Coach’s Corner, more speaking tips:

How to Get More Opportunities as a Guest Speaker – If you’re successful in generating speaking opportunities, you’ll create opportunities for your career. 

How to Obtain the Most Profit from Speaking Opportunities – It’s one thing to be invited to speak at your industry’s major event. But it’s another to create the right impression for your hosts, your audience and prospective customers or clients. There’s more to it than you might think. 

9 Tips to Connect with People after You Make Your Speech – Typically, in making a speech at a public forum, businesspeople hope to get a return on their investment. After all, giving a great speech or serving on a panel before a targeted audience necessitates your valuable time and effort in preparation. 

Public Speaking Tips – for Speeches in Accepting Awards, Honors – So you’re about to be honored for your pro bono work, volunteerism, or for creating a foundation to fund scholarships for education. But you get stage fright or don’t know how to most-effectively frame your acceptance speech? 

Tips for Building Long-Term Client Relationships with Effective Meetings – How are you faring with your clients? Not sure? To be certain you’re doing well, you must ask yourself three key questions. 

“The success of your presentation will be judged not by the knowledge you send but by what the listener receives.” 

-Lilly Walters


 __________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry. 





Photo courtesy of Ambro at www.freedigitalphotos.net

How to Get More Opportunities as a Guest Speaker



If you’re successful in generating speaking opportunities, you’ll create opportunities for your career. At the least, you’ll be in a position to raise your business profile.

Ideally, prospective clients or customers will be in the audience. Count on opportunities to develop centers of influence — people who can refer business to you. You can expand your comfort zone. Also, you can learn a lot by teaching or speaking.

By elevating your profile, it’s easier to keep your clients. At the very least, public speaking will help to keep your skills sharp.

Joey Tamer is in demand as a public speaker and moderator. Based in Los Angeles with an outstanding record of success, Ms. Tamer is a strategic consultant to technology and media.

Joey Tamer   Joey Tamer, www.joeytamer.com

She’s graciously shares her recommendations on how to be invited to speak at events for your niche industry.

Key first four steps:

  1. List of all the conferences special to your industry.
  2. List the events and conferences at which your competitors present (search your competitors’ websites).
  3. Select the ones that put that targeted decision maker in the audience.
  4. Refine your selection to prefer events that allow you a solo presentation. Panel participation is fine, but often is not as effective due to the limited time to show your expertise, bad moderators, and other conditions beyond your control. Another high priority includes events that allow either solo or panel presentation, but add on a breakout session or workshop as well.

By elevating your profile, it’s easier to keep your clients. At the very least, public speaking will help to keep your skills sharp.

Due diligence:

  1. Explore each event or conference website to determine if it attracts your target market in its audience. There will be a list titled “Who should attend.”
  2. Contact the conference (use an email address not associated with you or your company) to send you the promo package for sponsors or exhibitors. This should give you a much more detailed demographic and psychographic description of the attendees, by percentage (10% CxO, 25% VP, etc.) of rank.

Pitch:

  1. If the conference or the Call for Speakers lists its agenda of panels or speaking sessions, select the one or two that fit your expertise.
  2. Draft an introductory email (or fill in a Call for Speakers form) pitching the topic(s) you can offer for those items on the agenda. If there is space allowed, drop the names of at least two major conferences where you have presented this topic (or something similar) previously.
  3. If the Call for Speakers is open-ended, and no agenda is offered, then study the audience and mission statement of the conference and pitch a series of topics that they might be interested in considering.
  4. When offering to present, offer a list of two or three topics that might fit. Attach the Speaking page of your website as a PDF attachment.
  5. In your email, add a link to your speaking page and a link to the home page of your website.
  6. Your speaking testimonials should be included, usually on the Speaking page of your site. If they are on a separate page of your website, add a link to that page as well. Of course, if you know someone inside the organization that is hosting the conference, connect with that person to get any inside information you might use, or ask him/her to get your pitch letter to the best decision maker inside.

So now you know how to garner invitations to speak. But your job is only half-done. Here are Ms. Tamer’s tips on how to obtain the most profit from speaking opportunities.

(Note: I’m very familiar with Ms. Tamer’s expertise. She is a fellow member of Consultants West, www.consultantswest.com, a roundtable of veteran consultants in the Los Angeles area.)

From the Coach’s Corner, here are public speaking tips for accepting awards and honors.

“Speech is power: Speech is to persuade, to convert, to compel.”

-Ralph Waldo Emerson


__________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.



Public Speaking Tips – for Speeches in Accepting Awards, Honors



So you’re about to be honored for your pro bono work, volunteerism, or for creating a foundation to fund scholarships for education. But you get stage fright or don’t know how to most-effectively frame your acceptance speech?

Join the crowd. A lot of people have difficulty in public speaking.

Award speeches are all about being receptive and radiating with gratitude, while smiling and graciously accepting the honor from the heart in a spirit of openness and genuine feelings and emotional tones,” explains Eric Stone, a noted speech trainer.

“It is simply about what is true for you about the award, the people giving it to you and present with you, as well as the business or industry that you are in or cause you are representing,” he says.

ID-100307447 stockimagesMr. Stone has been teaching since 1983, and is the principal of Speakers and Artists International, Inc.

As a former New York City stage and television actor, early in his career he studied privately under Herbert Berghof, Uta Hagen, Lee Strasberg, Stella Adler, and William Hickey.

“I am very much a target oriented coach or trainer working on key issues and problem areas related to public performance,” he explains.

That includes speech training for executives.

“Public speaking relies on very simple yet wonderfully telling ‘dynamics’ between the speaker and his/her audience,” he asserts.

“That is the true competitive edge of this style of coaching which targets ‘organic, spontaneous and authentic’ enrollment techniques not outdated ‘external’ body language techniques and frozen gestures, postures and various similes,” Mr. Stone adds. “I have found that almost every problem a speaker experiences is related to those few and simple dynamics.”

“Award speeches are all about being receptive and radiating with gratitude, while smiling and graciously accepting the honor from the heart in a spirit of openness and genuine feelings and emotional tones.”

Mr. Stone recommends finding the most-effective key words, tone and phrasing for the specific situation.

“You have to be able to see yourself say those things and find a style to say them…casual, from the heart, entertaining, emotional, formal, elegant, and sophisticated, etc.,” he points out. “There are things you see yourself say and others not. The same goes for the manner in which you voice the things you say.”

Mr. Stone’s recommends these speech elements:

  • Gracious and heartfelt thanks for the organization giving you the honor
  • Acknowledgement of the special people in the audience: wife, daughter, brother, etc.
  • Acknowledgement of the audience who took time out to witness the celebration.
  • An appreciative awareness of those who made it possible for you to achieve the award.
  • What the award means to you – including reference to the values, goals, aspirations, etc., the organization or group represents and how they inspire you.
  • Stories – small personal heart-felt anecdotes to show what receiving this award means to you in your life. All from the heart so as to make it real for the audience.

He says you’ll need salient information:

  • Who will be in the audience? And will need to be thanked?
  • Is the event only for you or other things will be celebrated?
  • Have you received any directions or information regarding the event? Specifically about your receiving honor? Logistics? How long you are expected to speak, etc.
  • Who will be giving you the award? Name of person?

These are great tips to heed now — you never know when you’ll need them.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are relevant links:

Communication – You Can Train Yourself to Stop Stressing — It’s OK to be nervous before giving a speech or when you’re entering an important round of negotiations. Feeling pressure is one thing but allowing it to morph into stress and tension is another. When you allow this to happen, in a sense, you’re giving away your personal power, which inhibits your performance.

How to Get More Opportunities as a Guest Speaker — If you’re successful in generating speaking opportunities, you’ll create opportunities for your career. At the least, you’ll be in a position to raise your business profile. Ideally, prospective clients or customers will be in the audience. Count on opportunities to develop centers of influence — people who can refer business to you.

How to Obtain the Most Profit from Speaking Opportunities — It’s one thing to be invited to speak at your industry’s major event. But it’s another to create the right impression for your hosts, your audience and prospective customers or clients. There’s more to it than you might think. Widely acclaimed as a speaker and based in Los Angeles, Joey Tamer made her stellar reputation as a strategic consultant to entrepreneurs in technology and digital media, and to experienced consultants in all fields to maximize their practices.

9 Tips to Connect with People after You Make Your Speech — Typically, in making a speech at a public forum, businesspeople hope to get a return on their investment. After all, giving a great speech or serving on a panel before a targeted audience necessitates your valuable time and effort in preparation. You could give a speech and then go back to your office waiting for the phone to ring. Or, you could give a talk and then take strategic steps so that you can further connect with the individuals sitting in the audience – for strong results.

13 Best Practices for Fun, Successful PowerPoint Presentations — You want to give fun, successful PowerPoint presentations, right? To do so, you must remember the proper relationship among the slide, your audience and you, according to an expert. Here’s how.

“It usually takes more than three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech.”

-Mark Twain


 __________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy of StockImages at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.