Looking for a Job? Get a Personal Web Site for an Edge


Are you ready for this? If you’re looking for a job and competition is tough, human resource professionals say a personal Web site can be a valuable asset.

In fact, 67 percent of HR respondents to a 2015 survey say a site can differentiate you compared to someone who only submits a resume.

“The survey shows that, while recruiters continue to scan social posts for red flags, they view digital assets as tools to better understand candidates and to help them make more informed hiring decisions,” says Predrag Lesic, CEO of Domain.ME.

ID-10089550 imagerymajesticA market research firm, Research Now, conducted the study for Domain.ME, the provider of the .ME domain extension. By underwriting such a topic, the sponsor of the survey obviously has skin in the game.

But it’s worth noting the change in recruiters’ attitudes about digital content. For years, we’ve only been warning about being careful what you write in your social media. That’s still apropos. Again, your social media comments must be in good taste.

Some 300 U.S. human resource professionals, who regularly manage staffing and recruiting for their organizations, responded to the survey.

Key findings:

Sixty-eight percent of HR professionals are looking to assess personal qualities that aren’t perceptible from a traditional resume.

Half of survey respondents believe a personal Web site helps to “humanize” a candidate.
Nearly one third of the HR professionals surveyed agreed that a personal Web site can provide a competitive advantage in the job market.

Four-in-ten recruiters would be more inclined to contact a candidate with the personal Web site when considering two candidates with seemingly equal qualifications.

To illustrate the high level competition among jobseekers, HR professionals get 100 applications for each open position. That’s according to Beyond Academia, a conference that shows U.C. Berkeley Ph.D. job hunters how to get a job outside of higher education.

Courtesy of Domain.ME, here’s an informative infographic:

From the Coach’s Corner, more tips for job hunting:

Are You Struggling to Write Great Cover Letters? Here’s How — If you want to write a cover letter that will entice employers to consider you, there are several precautions to take. Otherwise, you risk sending a letter that employers won’t want to read. Here are seven strategies.

Checklist to Build Self Confidence for Career Success — Everybody occasionally struggles with self confidence. But some people have continuing low self esteem. Their lack of confidence serves as a big obstacle.

Looking for Your 1st Big Job? Think like a Boss — What do employers really want when they hire young college graduates? The key for you is to think like a boss. So put yourself in their shoes to cut through the clutter of your competing applicants.

After a Tough Job Hunt, Ease Your Burnout before Starting Your New Job — Any time you endure the pressures of a career move, you must recognize the signs of a burnout. So, you have to guard against burnout. If you get burned out, it’s best to alleviate it.

Dress for Success in Job Interviews – Tips for Women, Men — First impressions are lasting impressions. They really count in your job search. This is especially true if you’re working your way up your career ladder to management or any other important position in a conservative or traditional business environment.

“The hardest job kids face today is learning good manners without seeing any.”

Fred Astaire

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.

Photo courtesy imagerymajestic at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.