For Profits, Align Your HR Program with Your Business Strategy



For profits, a successful human-resources management strategy should complement your overall business strategy. This is just as important as a business plan and marketing plan.

By aligning your HR program with your organization’s plan and objectives, you are more likely to be profitable.

Overall, you need to implement some crucial elements.

For instance, analyze your HR strengths and weaknesses; train your employees; forecast what you’ll need in staffing; prepare for employee turnover; hire strategically; and prepare a succession plan.

To align your HR program with your business strategy, here’s a more detailed checklist:

1. Review your business strategy and goals

This is important so you don’t overlook anything to be in the best position to align your employee-development planning with your organization’s goals.

Identify and analyze critical roles in your business.

2. Plan for transparency

Inform your supervisors and key employees about your plan to make sure your company is effectively aligning your human resources program with business strategy.

Educate them on the process. Change make employees nervous. Be sure supervisors are ready to alleviate any concerns of their staffs and to explain how changes may or may not affect them.

3. Evaluate your staff

Check to be sure your employees fit well with their job descriptions. Identify their abilities, knowledge and skills including their certifications and education.

Evaluate your employees. Take steps to avoid making errors in your evaluations. Continue to assess the quality of their completed projects.

If you’re good at engaging your employees, you’ll discover tangible qualities. Look for any other salient talents, especially their soft skills for interacting with each other, customers and vendors.

Inspire them to maximize their performance. Determine if they’re promotable or at least willing to accept additional responsibilities.

Answer their questions. Be sure to give positive feedback at every opportunity.

4. Craft a set of employee-development blueprints

Engage your employees to fully ascertain their career goals and their talent levels. Compare their opinions with your impressions.

Determine what your workers need in the way of skill enhancements. Be positive in your interactions with your employees.

Develop your plan of action for each person.

Provide necessary training and education to fill in the employees’ skill gaps. Always focus on helping your employees to grow professionally.

Once they appear ready for advancement, test your approach. Create a few scenarios or projects to test their new skills and progress and enthusiasm for the additional work as growth opportunities.

5. Develop a succession plan

Turnover is inevitable. Your succession planning must be capable of helping you to evaluate and to have employees ready to overcome unforeseen obstacles.

It’s best to at least involve your supervisors and key employees in the process. If it isn’t feasible, it tells you important information about your culture.

To keep growing a business and long-term sustainability, it’s vital to preserve the trust of customers, employees, partners and investors. Therefore, succession planning is essential.

6. Do a gap analysis

You’ll need to fully understand your current situation – strengths and weaknesses – and what you’ll be needing to do in improving processes as well as designing and implementing best practices to achieve your goals.

Examine your job descriptions to evaluate whether they are compatible with what you want your employees to achieve.

Review your employee handbook to see if it’s current in terms of employment laws and regulations in the locales you plan to operate. Update where appropriate.

Remember companies that don’t convert their employee handbooks into electronic documents are missing noteworthy opportunities in human resources. If you haven’t already use best practices for an online employee handbook.

Have your employees read it and acknowledge their understanding.

Ascertain your training programs and what they’ll be needing.

Assess your health and benefit policies and procedures. Make sure you’re in full compliance at every level and meeting the needs of your workers.

Don’t forget about your technology. What works? What will you need?

7. Develop your new HR approach

Create an effective HR mission statement.

Ascertain your culture and skills inventory – if you have the right people and enough of them and whether they’re prepared for your growth. If necessary, plan to fix any culture shortcomings.

Promote a trust culture that’s appealing to everyone so you will profit from cross-generational teams.

Plan for the best-possible rewards package for your current staff and for any new employees.

Upgrade your technology and make sure your talent will be able to operate it.

8. Continuously monitor your HR approach

Review your plan on an ongoing basis to keep it aligned with your business strategy. Anticipate employee issues to keep a desirable culture.

Situations change. Regularly update your plan and procedures.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are relevant articles:

Management Strategies for Productive Applicant Interviews — You must be assertive – ask the right questions and listen intently to cut through the morass of canned answers to get the answers you need to make good hiring decisions.

11 Categories of Mistakes Face HR Departments – Biz Coach Tips — Beware: Many problems are not caused by HR professionals but by managers who don’t use best practices.

16 Best Practices to Stay out of Legal Trouble with Employees — Generally, in human resources, companies find themselves in legal hot water because they inadvertently make mistakes with their employees. It’s important to triple down on preventative measures and responses to legal hazards when necessary.

Tips to Prevent or, if Necessary, Eliminate Employee Toxicity — From time to time, nearly every boss has to cope with an employee’s negativity. That’s annoying enough, but you’ve got a nightmare if toxic attitudes spread among the rest of your workers. Here are solutions.

Productivity: 5 Management Tips to Motivate Your Employees — A major quandary for managers is to bring out the best in their employees. Every manager wants to do it, but it’s not always easy. What’s the reason? Usually, it’s because employees are disengaged – disconnected from their managers and companies. Here’s how to fix it.

“If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.”

-Henry Ford


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




Management – How to Alleviate 10 Trending Issues in HR



Along with the 21st century revolution in technology, there have been dramatic changes in human-resources management in every industry and profession.

This means there are many pitfalls to avoid in our evolving litigious society. Everyday it seems there are changes in law and societal norms.

You have tons of responsibilities in order to stay profitable, maintain employee morale and to avoid legal issues. Whew, it’s seemingly overpowering.

You know, of course, if you make a mistake there could be disastrous ramifications.

In general, bear in mind these emerging issues:

1. Teaching moments

First and foremost, it’s increasingly important to read and stay current on events in business.

When other companies and nonprofits make negative headlines, it’s an opportunity for you to learn and if necessary to implement improvements in policies and procedures.

As a starting point for a safety net, use Google Alerts for any or all the appropriate HR keywords. Plan carefully as it’s a long list of subjects.

This also means using the news events as teaching moments to educate your employees.

2. Handbook updates

Neither you, nor your company, and nor should your employees be relying on an employee handbook with illegal or antiquated policies. To avoid legal issues, make certain you have the best handbook values.

For your handbook, consider mandating arbitration to discourage frivolous complaints and lawsuits.

With all due disrespect for the legal profession, any time lawyers and juries are unnecessarily involved you can expect uncertainty.

Incidentally, companies that don’t have online employee handbooks are missing noteworthy opportunities in human resources.

3. Choosing words carefully

Whether you’re counseling one of your employees, documenting behavior and performance, or writing your handbook, be careful with your choice of words.

For example, a well-written set of performance goals work will help motivate employees and will help them focus better on their responsibilities. You can see 10 sample goal phrases here.

Avoid what an outside observer, such as judge, would consider to be “opinion.” So be specific about events and examples.

Times have changed. Above all, don’t use the word, “attitude.” You’ll be inviting legal trouble.

4. Gender bias

Actually, any form of bias or discrimination should be eliminated from your workplace, but gender bias has seeming been making more headlines.

ASAP, make sure to audit your benefits, policies and salaries to guard against gender bias. Continue to monitor your records. Make sure supervisors know to avoid gender bias.

These steps will help avert litigation or government involvement. But you need to do more to avoid EEOC discrimination suits.

Besides, know that your employees surf the Internet and pay attention to news coverage about inequality.

5. Terminations

Even if immediate termination seems appropriate, in most cases take a deep breath, document events, and pause for strategizing.

Instruct your employee to leave and report to HR the next day. Then, give the employee the opportunity to explain any possible extenuating circumstances.

Keep in mind that if you’re forced to terminate workers, ask yourself the right questions.

6. Pre-emptive legal action

In other words, don’t wait until an event blows up in your face. You’ll be more productive and will save money overall, if you use your outside attorney as an advisor.

Hopefully, you develop an intuitive antenna for HR issues before they become a crisis. When you anticipate a problem, call your attorney and ask questions before a crisis develops.

It’s much less costly to avoid courtroom litigation. By warding off problems, you’ll avoid an expensive legal defense.

You’ll need an HR specialist. Generally speaking, selecting the right business attorney, talent and skill levels are among the crucial traits needed for your success. So, have the right attorney for your business.

7. Anger in discipline

One rule of thumb is that it’s never OK to get angry in disciplining employees.

Not only does it help keep your blood pressure low, you can discipline or fire workers without causing unproductive drama and legal hassles.

Civility is important. So be tough on problems but soft on employees.

Careful planning is necessary before you give an employee an appraisal or before you terminate a person. In difficult situations, it’s vital for you to say the right things.

8. Employment Eligibility Verification forms (Form I-9)

Asking for green cards creates a huge risk factor. Don’t ask a lawful permanent resident for a green card.

Instead, request to see a driver’s license or other documentation. And make sure your I-9 records comply with the federal government. That’s an important step in preparation for an unannounced visit from ICE.

9. Retention of documents

Think about your retention of records. There are, of course, laws for records you need to keep. Laws require certain records anywhere from one to 30 years.

To avoid possible mistakes by destroying employee records too soon, add two or three years to the required duration in your retention of documents.

If you aren’t able to supply relevant documentation, you’ll pay a heavy price.

In some cases, you’ll even be forced to give the job back to a nonperforming or toxic employee so use best practices to guard against legal risks.

10. Rules regarding tattoos

As the adage goes, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. If you have a rule regarding tattoos, avoid a mistake.

It’s not enough for your policy to inform employees that they can’t show “offensive tattoos.” Therefore, prohibit “visible tattoos.”

From the Coach’s Corner, related information:

Tips to Prevent or, if Necessary, Eliminate Employee Toxicity — From time to time, nearly every boss has to cope with an employee’s negativity. That’s annoying enough, but you’ve got a nightmare if toxic attitudes spread among the rest of your workers. Here are solutions.

HR: Is it Time to Rethink Your Marijuana-Testing Policy?  — For HR departments, it was once-unthinkable: Deleting Marijuana from the list of drugs in workplace drug-testing programs. But should you? And what should you do about your handbook policies?

Tips for Productive Meetings to Improve Performance — Here’s a checklist to engage your employees in energetic, inspiring staff meetings that will increase profits.

Legal HR Issues? Best Practices in Workplace Investigations — As an employer, one of your biggest nightmares can be issues involving your employees. There can be many reasons to conduct an investigation. “Action expresses priorities,” said Mohandas Gandhi. So you should act quickly.

10 Tips on Responding to EEOC Complaints — Despite all the court cases, warnings and complaints filed at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, EEOC complaints are a nightmare for management.

“The value of a business is a function of how well the financial capital and the intellectual capital are managed by the human capital. You’d better get the human capital part right.” 

-Dave Bookbinder


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




Employer Tips: How to Deal with a Visit from ICE

 

A visit from ICE – the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement – is a cause for concern.

Of course, there’s no need to panic if you’ve already taken the right precautions to avoid legal hassles with ICE.

However, if you haven’t completed your due diligence, you risk massive fines.

Worse, historically employers and their HR employees have also been jailed for violations.

So not only do you have to be diligent in organizing your I-9s, you have to be very diligent in your response to an NOI.

Your response sets the stage for communication, either effectively defending your company or possible negotiations and a settlement with ICE.

Assuming you sanction your receptionist to accept and receive important documents like a notice of inspection (NOI), require the person to immediately notify you and/or your second-in-command and your human resources manager.

Your attorney should advise you and take the lead. Otherwise, only a designated manager should have further contact with ICE.

You’ll be required by law to respond within three days – 72 hours.

What NOIs mean

ICE wants to see:

  • Your I-9 forms for both current and recently terminated employees
  • Payroll records
  • List of current employees
  • Information regarding the company’s owners

If an ICE agent shows up at your office with an NOI, here are two strategies:

1. Interfacing with ICE 

Don’t be lulled into thinking the person is on your side. Don’t let the ICE agent trick you into saying something that could be used against you later.

Assume the agent is there to build a case.

Be civil, honest, brief and thoughtful. That also means being careful what you say – like you would in a courtroom – don’t say more than is needed.

Don’t rush the process even if you’re confident. Take your full allotted time to respond.

Your immigration attorney should audit your paperwork.

Additionally, your lawyer should help you respond by interfacing with ICE – for the audit and any extenuating circumstances.

Ideally, you have been thorough in your planning.

However, if you’re unsure about anything mentioned in the NOI, it’s businesslike within the three-day period to ask for two things: Elucidation and confirmation of your request and ICE’s answer.

(Again, your attorney should be involved.)

2. Paper trail … paper trail … and paper trail

Accuracy is vital and make certain you make a list of the information you give ICE.

The ICE audit won’t be conducted at your office. It will be on ICE’s turf – the government office.

Consider giving the agent a carbon copy of your I-9 forms with supporting records. Then, ask for a receipt of your list and documentation.

Finally, keep careful notes of any verbal communication, and document all details in an e-mail or letter to ICE.

From the Coach’s Corner, more HR tips to avoid legal problems:

Employee Records: Which Ones to Save and for How Long — You don’t want to keep unnecessary employee records. Nor do you want to make a rash decision on whether to destroy records. Here are the laws you need to know.

Management/HR Tips: Checking References of Applicants –– Even if you believe you’ve found an impeccable candidate, you must conduct precise reference checks. If you don’t, you risk paying a high price later.

Legal HR Issues? Best Practices in Workplace Investigations –– As an employer, one of your biggest nightmares can be issues involving your employees. There can be many reasons to conduct an investigation. “Action expresses priorities,” said Mohandas Gandhi. So you should act quickly.

Avoid EEOC Legal Hassles over Unpaid Leave Requirements — You might want to review your current human resource policies. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has continued to push employers on unpaid leave under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Management: 5 Most Common Reasons to Fire Employees — With difficult employees, you have two obvious problems – the impacts on your organization and the behavior of the individual. Here’s what to do.

With Fraud Running Rampant, How HR Can Help Prevent It — By taking alert measures, human resources can play a major role to put a dent in the global epidemic of fraud in the workplace.

Tips for Handling Your Employees’ Wage Garnishments — Handling wage garnishments of your employees’ paychecks – including communication – is a very sensitive issue. Here are four management tips.

“Success in management requires learning as fast as the world is changing.”

-Warren Bennis

 

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.

 

These 13 Red Flags Are Signs Employees Dislike You



Your employees might not tell you that they hate you, but there are many signs that will tip you off.

There might be reasons for it. Whether you’re lacking in soft-communication skills that create warm fuzzies or you’re simply an out-and-out tyrant, either way your employees will think you’re a bad boss.

You’ll be in the dark if they want to make sure they keep their jobs.

However, you’ll find out what employees think about you if you learn to enhance your EI, or emotional intelligence.

That’s the first step whether to improve your communication skills or to learn best practices in management.

(Scroll down to the Coach’s Corner for helpful hints.)

Obviously, it’s best if employees respect you. They’ll have better morale which leads to creativity, teamwork, productivity and profits.

If you’re a manager it also minimizes the likelihoods of you getting fired, or with employees filing complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

If employees dislike you, here are the red flags:

1. Your instinctive feeling

Consider what your gut tells you. Perhaps you don’t know why you’re uncomfortable, but you simply feel something’s amiss with your relationships.

2. Employees aren’t enthusiastic

If it appears they’re not enthusiastic about pitching in on projects or they don’t seem diligent in their work, that’s a sign.

3. High rate of tardiness, absenteeism

Employees, who are often late, take long breaks, leave early or don’t show up at work because they’re sick or stressed, it’s often because they don’t like your company.

4. Employees avoid you

People avoid a boss when they feel intimidated or they don’t like the person. For instance, employees might turn their back when you’re nearby or head for the stairs when you’re near the elevator.

5. Poor eye contact

If you have an employee who maintains good eye contact with others but not with you, it’s not a good sign. Weak eye contact makes it easier for them to hide their contempt for you.

6. Employees don’t smile around you

If employees habitually don’t smile when with you but smile or laugh with others, you’ve likely got a problem.

A related omen: If employees stop smiling or joking when you enter the room. They obviously don’t feel comfortable with you.

7. You’re not included in social events 

If you’re not invited to happy hours or other get-togethers, your employees indirectly are telling you they want to minimize their time spent with you.

8. Negative body language

You know what it means when someone constantly folds their arms or when their eyes glaze over when you talk, right?

9. Employees are abrupt

Try an experiment by cordially greeting your employees. If on Monday you ask them how their weekend was or how their day is going, if they always say “fine,” you’ve got troubles.

10. Their preferred communication is email

Unhappy workers will minimize their personal contact with you. This is especially true if their emails don’t have a greeting, such as “hi” or “hello.”

11. Their office door is usually closed

A frequently closed door usually means the person is on the phone looking for another job, commiserating with friends or family, or asking someone for advice.

12. Consistent disagreement

Aggressive personalities are less likely to avoid you. But they don’t refrain from conversations because they want to argue with you.

It’s also possible they aren’t afraid of personality clashes because they’re sick and tired of working for a tyrant. Whoa.

13. Employees are quitting without offering a good reason

To paraphrase an axiom: People don’t quit their jobs, they quit their boss. If, on exit interviews, employees don’t cite a reason, it’s often because they don’t like or respect you. Ouch.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are relevant topics:

How to Grow Your EI for Leadership Success — Emotional intelligence (EI) is important for communication and leadership. A person who has EI is able to evaluate, understand, and control emotions.

13 Management Tips to Solve Employee Absenteeism — Absenteeism causes migraines for a lot of bosses. Obviously, your company will make healthier profits, if you don’t have an absenteeism problem.

HR: Say the Right Things in Difficult Situations with Employees — Careful planning is necessary before you give an employee an appraisal or in advance of terminating the person. Here are 10 tips.

‘That’s the Way It Is’ – Often a Lazy Reaction to Employees — When employees question your policies, don’t let your ego dictate how you react to them. Consider it as though they’re merely questioning you. They just might be positive change agents for you. So here’s how to profit from change agents.

Avoid EEOC Legal Hassles over Unpaid Leave Requirements — You might want to review your current human resource policies. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has continued to push employers on unpaid leave under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

5 Quick Management Tips to Motivate Your Employees — A major quandary for managers is to bring out the best in their employees. Every manager wants to do it, but it’s not always easy. What’s the reason? Usually, it’s because employees are disengaged – disconnected from their managers and companies. Here’s how to fix it.

The key to being a good manager is keeping the people who hate you away from those who are still undecided.


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy imagerymajestic at www.freedigitalphotos.net

‘That’s the Way It Is’ – Often a Lazy Reaction to Employees



Do you get annoyed when employees criticize your decisions or policies? When they don’t make any sense such employees are frustrating.

With frustrating employees, especially if they’re difficult, you have two obvious problems: 1. The impacts on your organization. 2. The behavior of the individual.

Their ideas are often a waste of time and energy – theirs and yours. The impacts are all related to the loss of profit. Toxic employees warrant your best coaching tactics.

Frustrations from dealing with difficult employees coincide with many management issues – teamwork, morale, organizational dysfunction and weak customer relationships.

These issues also translate into an growth opportunity for you – to learn how to enjoy your job managing difficult employees.

Case study confession

As a business-performance consultant, I advise clients to listen and keep an open mind.

Why? I’ve seen both sides of the equation. Some criticism is warranted.

Prior to my consulting career, I was once the employee who consistently came up with ideas to improve operations. With an eye on profits, inefficiency frustrated me.

My enlightened bosses readily accepted my ideas.

However, my ego-driven bosses readily rejected the ideas without considering their merit. It was frustrating to hear the phrases, “That’s the way it is” or “That’s the way we’ve always done it.” Ugh.

But here’s the moral:

While I can honestly say my suggestions were creative and profitable, I was part of the problem. How?

As in any differences of opinion, no person is 100 percent in the right. It might be a 50/50 or 90/10 ratio. The latter ratio was my case as I was too abrupt in presenting or implementing my ideas.

By extension,  your employees can be sophisticated in their thinking with productive ideas, but they can be unpolished in presenting them to you.

Personal lessons

The mistake I made was not learning and using soft skills in order to persuade bosses on my ideas.

Behaving and speaking with finality – as a self-appointed efficiency expert – wasn’t the right choice to make. I learned the hard way the importance of using the tools in the art of persuasion.

So, as an employee, my practice of submitting ideas taught me lessons that helped me later in my management and consulting careers.

For bosses, there is tremendous value in their soliciting ideas from employees as well as using proper listening skills.

For employees, it’s best to adopt the best practices in marketing ideas to the boss.

Respond; don’t just react. In other words, think about what they’re saying before you respond. They just might be your best change agents.

The No. 1 mistake managers make is their failure to listen to employees.

The No. 2 mistake bosses make is their poor interaction with their employees.

Change agents

Ironically, many employees just might be the best change agents.

While a company needs policies and procedures, not all are productive in serving customers or providing protection from lawsuits or regulations.

On the other hand, some policies don’t make sense but they’re not challenged.

When employees question your policies, don’t let your ego dictate how you react to them. Consider it as though they’re merely questioning, not challenging you.

Respond to them. Don’t just react.

In other words, think about what they’re saying before you respond. Give a thoughtful response. They just might be your best change agents.

Seriously, one good idea could be worth $1 million to you.

And if your employees seem too abrupt in asking a question or making a suggestion, consider coaching them. Stellar bosses help employees to grow professionally.

Along the way, count your blessings.

Such employees might very well be your talented change agents. They’re to be recognized. Don’t risk them quitting and leaving only to help your competitor.

The bottom-line: You will enhance your profits if you partner with your employees. Don’t be lazy – respond, don’t react.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related management strategies:

For Strong Profits, 5 Tips to Develop Employees as Leaders — Strong leaders will help your business grow and enjoy excellent profits. That’s because, as role models, they’re instrumental in helping you develop a performance culture.

5 Quick Management Tips to Motivate Your Employees — A major quandary for managers is to bring out the best in their employees. Every manager wants to do it, but it’s not always easy. What’s the reason? Usually, it’s because employees are disengaged – disconnected from their managers and companies. Here’s how to fix it.

Employees Will Help You in Strategic Planning If You Use 3 Tips — Have you developed your strategy? It’s important to proceed without engaging in self-doubt. But you’re concerned about involving your employees? There are three closely related basics in working with your employees to get the job done.

Advice for Men: How to Manage Women Employees — You must exercise due diligence to motivate talented employees and retain them for an efficient and productive workplace. But many male managers unwittingly mismanage their female employees.

4 Tips to Motivate Employees When You’re Facing Adversity — Effective bosses have antennas to alert them over looming challenges. If they don’t have such an antenna, it’s important for them to develop one for multiple credibility reasons. Even the bosses of small companies can suffer from image problems externally and internally. Either one or both will adversely affect profits.

“I’m not the smartest fellow in the world, but I can sure pick smart colleagues.”

-Franklin D. Roosevelt


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




Leadership: 4 Strategies Dealing with Incompetent People



Yes, incompetent employees – whether they have difficult personalities or they simply under-perform – can be aggravating. But they don’t have to be.

For whatever reason when employees fail to perform, it’s still vital for managers to show leadership by maintaining their cool.

Why? For two reasons:

Firstly, managers should never give away their personal power by getting angry. Secondly, it isn’t always possible to fire incompetence.

So a manager must step up and show leadership – with detachment, not indifference. Yes, there is a difference.

With detachment, leaders methodically reflect on a problem with emotional intelligence. (More on this later in the Coach’s Corner.) They understand the root causes and take positive action.

However, with indifference, managers don’t act with leadership. They don’t accurately analyze the reasons for the problem. Consequently, they act with haste not with emotional sobriety.

In fact, great managers actually know how to enjoy their jobs even with difficult employees.

id-10091536So leaders know to use four techniques:

1. Communicating

The first indicator of issues is a lack of communication and missing information.

As a result, people resort to making false assumptions.

When issues manifest themselves as problems – poor sales, for example – employees point fingers.  That results in stress, tension and poor morale.

Despite being surrounded by incompetent workers, leaders know they have to act like the only adult in the room.

Leaders set parameters and procedures for communication. They give examples of how they want the employees to engage in discussions.

This usually entails meetings or one-to-one discussions with documentation. That means written follow-ups on which employees can refer later.

2. Record-keeping

For situations involving toxic workers, there are always unnecessary challenges. But they must be addressed.

The best option is always to take preventative measures – with transparency and documentation. That’s right, document everything.

3. Staying calm

While it’s true that incompetence is infuriating, leaders don’t show it.

They take precautions with plenty of rest, recreation and exercise. Should tensions rear their ugly heads, leaders do what they need to do to stay calm.

That might mean taking a break, going for a walk or talking with a sounding board.

Even leaders get to where they are because they have a role model or mentor – someone who listens, provides empathy and provides objective feedback.

They brace themselves.

Leaders always consider the big picture – the overall welfare of the company. Leaders know that emotional sobriety with mental preparation is vital for success.

They know if they’re detached, other employees rise to the occasion and deliver strong performances to offset incompetent team members.

In other words, they deliberate and they don’t make rash decisions with hurried actions.

4. Coaching

Frustrations from dealing with difficult employees coincide with many issues for management – teamwork, morale, organizational dysfunction and weak customer relationships – just to name a handful.

They’re all related to loss of profit. So, toxic employees warrant coaching tactics.

Furthermore, to effectively replace mediocrity with strong performance, leaders optimize talent by developing a coaching culture.

If your suppliers or strategic partners are dysfunctional, you can effectively deal with them. The key is to coach your vendors and strategic partners.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related sources of information:

How to Grow Your EI for Leadership Success — Emotional intelligence (EI) is important for communication and leadership. A person who has EI is able to evaluate, understand, and control emotions.

Trending – the 7 Biggest Challenges for Management — In our complex Digital-Age economy with Millennials replacing baby boomers, we can draw some conclusions about developing trends. Management typically faces seven workforce challenges.

5 Top Leadership Philosophies in Business Management — From Seattle to Singapore, top managers show leadership by coaching their teams to success. They accomplish goals with five habitual philosophies.

Leadership Tips for Executing Strategy to Defeat Threats — Multiple solutions might work to triumph over a threat, but a global study in 20 sectors in 20 countries shows execution trumps strategy. Here’s how leaders execute strategy.

5 Traits of People Who Deliver Bad News Well — Are you nervous about giving bad news to others? Do you wish you were good at it? If you answer yes to either question, here are five traits of good messengers.

As Trustworthy Leaders, Great Bosses Have 5 Traits — Trust, or lack of it, is an obstacle to leadership. It’s a mega issue in America. It’s reached crisis proportions. Published polls show Americans distrust their political leaders, journalists and CEOs. So it’s obvious there are countless missed opportunities in politics, the news media and business. A Stanford professor provides solutions.

“I always tell employees: ‘The group’s benefit is more important than your personal benefit.’”

-Terry Gou


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Courtesy of imagerymajestic at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Management: 5 Most Common Reasons to Fire Employees



Imagine a hypothetical scenario for a moment the boss, Jane, is frantically trying to optimize revenue.

But an employee named Sue goes to Jane with a troubling story about another employee named Mary. Ironically, Mary is the best-selling employee.

Sue alleges that the Mary is not only under-performing in customer service, she is turning off customers by treating them badly.

Jane panics. It makes her so angry that she approaches Mary with the allegation and reproaches her.

id-10089464Mary is dumbfounded. She becomes upset and denies the allegation. An argument ensues and Jane fires Mary.

Naturally, as a boss you’re more savvy than Jane. You know not to get sucked into this quagmire.

You know not to congratulate Sue for being a tattletale and not to take punitive action against Mary.

Instead, you would have walked the floor at least twice a day to observe your employees working with customers.

You would also have recalled Mary’s superior performance.

You would also have explained to Sue that she should focus on her own customer service skills and not be monitoring other employees unless there’s illegal activity or someone’s safety is at-risk.

As a manager, your job is sometimes made more difficult than necessary because of unproductive workers.

With difficult employees, you have two obvious problems – the impacts on your organization and the behavior of the individual. So you should use tactics to enjoy your job managing difficult employees.

You also need to accurately appraise employee performances by avoiding 12 errors in evaluations.

After sufficient counseling and evaluations and employees aren’t able to improve, a good manager doesn’t allow the persons to overstay their welcome.

For a business to perform well, here are the five typical reasons to terminate workers:

1. Lack of productivity

In an uncertain marketplace, it’s not unusual for productivity to slow down. There can be many reasons why an employee is not at fault.

However, if it’s shown you have workers whose productivity is poor, fail to improve, show signs they don’t want to improve or they take up too much of your attention, it’s time for you to act.

That even goes for employees with a good work ethic and who are amiable and reliably on time, if they fail to develop their skills to help you make a dollar. You must make a change.

2. Toxic behavior

Some employees should not be allowed to stay if they’re morale busters.

For instance, perhaps they bully others, frequently argue with you or coworkers, spread rumors, fail to carry out company policies or complain about job requirements, you need to sever the employer-employee relationship.

Aimless complaining is a symptom of problems in teamwork, morale, negativity and/or productivity. You should be getting good employee ideas, not whining.

“Work is accomplished by those employees who have not yet reached their level of incompetence.”

-Laurence J. Peter

3. Cannot cope with change

You must have a workforce that understands change is unavoidable. Employees must be OK with change and be flexible to change or improve with the times.

When you have normally dependable workers but who can’t cope, you must nevertheless replace them.

4. No call or no show

When employees suffer a personal tragedy like the loss of a loved one, sometimes the last thing they remember to do is to call into work. Empathy is recommended.

But it’s a red flag if they have another tragedy and fail to call.

To avert losing time and money, your company must have good policies regarding absences.

If employees fail to call again, chances are they’re undesirable workers in other respects. If so, it’s time to let them go.

For healthy profits, it’s also good strategy to embark on a program solve employee absenteeism.

5. Customer and supplier complaints

When a customer or vendor feels taken for granted, 70 percent of the time they will fire your company.

Worse, your word-of-mouth advertising will suffer. Unhappy people will usually complain to numerous others.

For your customers, especially, their complaints about your company will become a crusade in their daily conversations or on social media.

You can’t afford employees who aren’t service-minded for your customers and vendors.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related resource links:

Workplace Bullying – Tips for Victims and Bosses — Workplace issues include bullying. It’s a widespread problem for employers and employees, alike. Here are valuable tips for both employers and workplace victims.

Legal HR Issues? Best Practices in Workplace Investigations — As an employer, one of your biggest nightmares can be issues involving your employees. There can be many reasons to conduct an investigation. “Action expresses priorities,” said Mohandas Gandhi. So you should act quickly.

Critical HR Recruiting Strategies for Business Profit — By developing strategic recruiting plans, human resources professionals will make significant contributions to the bottom-line profit goals of their employers. So, it’s imperative to innovate in your recruiting processes and market your strategies to senior management and hiring managers.

How to Rock Your Human Resources with Employee Referrals — Admittedly, there’s a myriad of ways to recruit great employees. But no recruitment option surpasses a well-executed, strategic employee-referral program.

Probation Meetings – HR Tactics for New Employee Success — Hiring employees is expensive. So it’s important to use tactics that will help insure success of new workers. That calls for probation meetings. Here are five proven tactics.

Risk Management in Hiring: Pre-Employment Screening Tips — Here are two questions about hiring: 1) what’s the biggest mistake companies make in hiring employees; and 2) what’s the biggest legal obstacle employers face in hiring? Here’s what to do about background screening.

“Work is accomplished by those employees who have not yet reached their level of incompetence.”

-Laurence J. Peter


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry. 





Photo courtesy imagerymajestic at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Strategic HR Management for Retaining High Performers



You must build your organizational capabilities if you want to create an environment that will retain high performers. The way to accomplish it is to be committed to strong results with specialized retention initiatives for your talent.

High performers are intense about their work. They thrive under pressure. They‘re engineered to enjoy pressure without letting it become stress.

They believe mediocre performance is to be disrespected. For them and for the people around them, high performers believe it’s unacceptable to fail.

You must proactively demonstrate you want your strong players to be content to stay with your company.  To cultivate long-term loyalty, don’t wait until you think your valued employee wants to leave.

If you wait until the last minute to address the issue, sometimes you can persuade the person to stay. But the problem is you haven’t changed to a culture of winning, and the employee will soon leave anyway.

ID-10040845 (2) AmbroSo to be consistent for a high-performing culture, here are five strategies:

1. Start by training your supervisors and managers

Your managers have to be trained in your new values and retention best-practices.

The old axiom is true: “Employee don’t quit jobs. They quit their bosses.”

So develop your management team to better-communicate and to partner with your employees as a catalyst for high performance.

You can optimize talent management by developing a coaching culture.

(What follows are specific tips for communicating with employees.)

2. Retaining high performers starts with recruitment and hiring

Don’t settle – ever. You must focus on attracting retainable employees.

You and your managers must sit down and ascertain your desired attitudes, backgrounds, abilities, and personality attributes.

This is important not only to attract a high performer to meet a short-term need, but to do it continuously for all employees – to make certain you benefit from a high-performing culture in which strong performers excel. A sports team never wins with just one star player.

3. Think big picture

Typically, organizations will hire a great employee to fill a pressing need. The companies anticipate the person will be successful in the position.

But things go awry when employers mistakenly believe such persons want to stay in that position indefinitely. In reality, the persons are already strategizing about their careers.

What’s the solution to retain them? Determine the persons’ motivations and plan the persons’ career.

For instance, you might have salespersons who like sales work but want to be challenged and to make a better income. You might consider making available better-appealing products and services to broaden their horizons and sales opportunities.

If you have people who want to become managers, map out how they can climb the ladder. Define some long-term goals for their self-study and provide them with management training.

In other words, become expert in helping employees grow professionally,

4. Always keep it customized

High performers share competitive traits, but keep in mind each person can have different motivators. So follow one simple approach: Recognize their achievements and ask them what will motivate them further.

It isn’t always about money. Such performers are competitive – they enjoy challenges. They usually want opportunities for growth.

If they have certain lifestyle preferences, they want a balance to enjoy their time off work, too. They want to feel appreciated with workplace flexibility. Accommodate them.

5. Deal with under-performing employees

Before firing workers who have become unproductive, do the right thing by coaching them. If it’s a simple case of burnout, find out why and take appropriate action.

Some people might be in the wrong position. If they’re been promoted to it make sure they’re not experiencing The Peter Principle (some are promoted to their level of incompetence).

If that’s the case, you’ll have to make changes. On the other hand, sometimes all is requiring is some training or more communication.

If bad behavior is the problem, take corrective measures.

If your employees have gut-wrenching emotional issues from personal problems such as death in the family, divorce or health concerns, show a liberal amount of empathy and support.

About 10 percent of under-performance problems stem from alcohol or drug abuse. In such cases, take steps to try to help the employees.

You’ll find drug abuse is more difficult with which to deal than alcoholism. The right thing is to try to save them and their jobs. But don’t be a doormat in the process.

If the employees have money issues, try to be empathetic. But beware money issues are common cause for embezzlement or theft.

In all cases, be empathetic and supportive. But maintain arms-length professionalism in the process.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are additional resources:

For Strong Profits, Create an Effective HR Mission Statement — So you’re creative in marketing. You’re innovative in human resources. Your company probably has an impressive mission statement. But do you have strong profits?

HR Management: Think Like a Sales Pro to Recruit the Best Talent — One-size-fits-all approach to recruiting employees is not a strategy. You and your peers in human resources might be enamored with technology, but job candidates want more focus on the personal touch. That necessitates thinking like a sales professional.

Probation Meetings – HR Tactics for New Employee Success — Hiring employees is expensive. So it’s important to use tactics that will help insure success of new workers. That calls for probation meetings. Here are five proven tactics.

How to Rock Your Human Resources for Employee Referrals — Admittedly, there’s a myriad of ways to recruit great employees. But no recruitment option surpasses a well-executed, strategic employee-referral program.

Get the Maximum Benefit from Your Part-Time Employees — Are you getting the most benefit from your part-time employees? Many employers are so focused on putting out fires and taking care of their full-time staff members, they inadvertently overlook their part-time employees.

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.”

-Aristotle 


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




 

Photo courtesy Ambro at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Cost-Cutting Layoffs Don’t Always Improve Profits


Lessons for small companies from big business



Layoffs are generally seen as a tool to reduce costs and improve profits. Reducing payroll expenses to meet short-term performance targets is largely futile.

The temptation to lay off a lot of people is a sign your company has a lot of problems – that won’t be easily solved.

Simply put, layoffs don’t accomplish the goal.

Certainly, your human capital is a major cost. And it would seem logical that if you lay off people, your costs would go down increasing your profits.

However, it doesn’t. (More on that later.)

franky242 MEETINGNor is it a socially responsible way to manage people.

True, a lot of companies offer early retirement, retrain employees and slow their pace of hiring. But far too many don’t use these options.

This country has developed a layoff mentality whether the economy is good or bad.

Either layoffs or they’re only hiring part-time workers or independent contractors. That helps to explain why the average American workweek has been 35 hours or less for many years.

Agreed, sometimes layoffs are necessary in a dynamic marketplace. Companies do have to make changes to compete in this technologically advanced Digital Age.

Ordinarily, layoffs do promote a short-term profit bounce but they don’t result in high performance or sustainability. In fact, layoffs give a false hope for profits and should be viewed as a red flag.

It’s easy to underestimate the cost of layoffs, such as in customer service and sales. Why? Sales drop with fewer customer service and sales employees.

Assuming a company rebounds, eventually it has to hire staff. But recruiting, hiring and training are costly.

Lower morale

There’s another residual cost – lower morale among the remaining workers. Employee loyalty becomes problematic. Low morale motivates workers to quit and go elsewhere.

In my experience, companies enjoy stronger performance if they retain talented people who loyally strive for excellence.

For senior management, it requires courage and leadership. There’s no long-term gain without short-term pain.

“ We simply attempt to be fearful when others are greedy and to be greedy only when others are fearful.”

-Warren Buffett

Finance-centered decisions – to attain quarterly earnings targets at the expense of socially responsible decisions — don’t bode well for the long term. Call it Karma if you will.

Strategic thinking for true performance can outlast obstacles such as geopolitical turmoil, interest-rate change speculation, low-energy prices or stock-market volatility. Talent can help employers meet such challenges.

There are fewer large companies now than there were forty years ago. The trend isn’t likely to reverse itself.

IPO freeze

All you have to do is consider the initial public offering freeze. In 2015, there were fewer and smaller IPOs.

There were only 51 IPOs in the second half of 2015. The 2015 aggregate deal value only totaled $30.1 billion.

Finance-centered decisions are apparent in IPOs that benefit a relative few. Many IPOs aren’t issued to raise money for a financial foundation and sustainability.

They’re issued to provide a nest egg for the shareholders, and founders who possess dual-class shares. This insures they retain control, and is why many are so focused on short-term pressures.

But if the founders are enlightened, the opposite can happen.

Consider a legacy of the late Steve Jobs at Apple. When the recessionary dot-com bubble hit, he decided to invest in research and development, not layoffs.

Later we saw iTunes, iPod and iPad. The sour economy didn’t hurt Apple. Tepid economies don’t have to hurt small companies, either.

From the Coach’s Corner, some other articles for you:

Step-by-Step Solutions for a Financial Turnaround — Difficult economic conditions have exacerbated the financial woes facing many businesses. But business success is possible for companies suffering through red ink. Here are financial solutions that will help facilitate a company turnaround.

Overcoming Obstacles for Business Turnaround — 13 Steps — For a successful turnaround of financially troubled businesses, there are usually two obstacles to overcome. They include the ego of the business owner or CEO, and poor advice by the lawyers. It’s difficult for a business owner or CEO to accept the need for a turnaround specialist.

5 Quick Management Tips to Motivate Your Employees — A major quandary for managers is to bring out the best in their employees. Every manager wants to do it, but it’s not always easy. What’s the reason? Usually, it’s because employees are disengaged – disconnected from their managers and companies. Here’s how to fix it.

“We simply attempt to be fearful when others are greedy and to be greedy only when others are fearful.”

-Warren Buffett


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy franky242 at www.freedigitalphotos.net

7 HR Insights to Quickly Improve Your Company



In this apparent age of ageism, many employers mistakenly prioritize by hiring Millennials. Their reasons might seem valid.

For instance in cultural concerns, they misguidedly believe they need people who can better relate to young workers. Or they might want to save on health insurance costs.

So they often blindly overlook the over-40 crowd in favor of hiring Millennials.

ID-10065921 David Castillo DominiciBut whether you’re a young entrepreneur or a seasoned veteran, you’ll find advantages and profit in hiring employees with a rich background of experiences.

You can actually turbo charge your benefits by recruiting well.

It’s not only about benefiting from hiring a high-performing employee.

You might need a bench coach – someone seasoned enough to help you to motivate and educate your workers — or someone who can serve as a mentor to you.

Any extra expense in healthcare insurance will be more than offset by the value of experienced older workers.

You’ll also find such a candidate who will work just as hard or harder than you. And they’ll be appreciative for the opportunity to serve.

So don’t overlook a candidate over 40 years of age.

To hire for such exceptionalism, here are seven insights:

1. Negotiate pay as an adventure

With a wealth of experience, a person 40+ usually has remained unemployed because they’re mistakenly perceived as being over-qualified when they’ve applied for jobs.

So they cringe when asked to disclose their pay history.

If they’re long-term unemployed, chances are their credit ratings have suffered. Don’t automatically hold their financial situations against them.

Be prepared to negotiate salary and benefits. If what you pay is insufficient to meet their needs, remember they can always moonlight without hurting their performance for you.

Better yet, you can discourage moonlighting and encourage strong performances by offering performance-based bonuses.

2. Consider a prospect who obviously dumbs down the resume

Many candidates who have a wide breath of experience dumb down their resumes so they don’t look over-qualified.

They also know that employers mistakenly assume an older employee doesn’t have relevant skills.

So they try not to appear over-qualified.

“I hire people brighter than me and then I get out of their way.”

-Leo Lacocca

3. Consider older entrepreneurs

While it’s true most entrepreneurs are mavericks, such independent-minded workers are often pressured into entrepreneurship because they can’t find a job.

It isn’t always true that an older worker can’t fit in your culture. Chances are that such a candidate knows how to fit in and be a high performer.

4. Scope out the self-employed on LinkedIn

Many LinkedIn members, who are self-employed, might be ideal candidates for you.

5. Prospect for employees who have more experience than you

A seasoned performer often has more relevant experience than you or your employees.

To use a Hollywood metaphor, they’re like an experienced director who has already seen all the movies. They’ve learned valuable lessons.

They more readily see opportunities and pitfalls. They provide valuable insights that you otherwise might overlook.

So put them in a director’s chair.

6. Leverage their hunger

A smart, experienced worker – suffering from unemployment, quite often is hungry – hungry to prove themselves.

Even if their skills need updating, they’re more malleable because they have strong incentives to keep their jobs and succeed.

Older persons with families are well-motivated to feed the family, which helps to account for their aggressive behavior to outperform.

8. Leave your ego at home

Sad but true, some employers are threatened by a candidate with a rich background of experience and success.

So forget your ego, and hire a person with strong qualifications.

You’re more likely to find more time to spend with your family or on the golf course to make new sales.

From the Coach’s Corner, related management tips:

Millennial Manager: Earn Respect, Get Results with 6 Tips — It can be tough to manage baby boomers. Not because they’re difficult workers. Your learning has just begun. Remember a lot of baby boomers know they have more experience than you; perhaps even in management. Maybe even in your job.

Human Resources – Slow Motion Gets You There Faster — Hoagy Carmichael’s phrase, “Slow motion gets you there faster,” is apropos in hiring the best workers for high performance. Here’s why and how to do it.

Risk Management in Hiring: Pre-Employment Screening Tips — Here are two questions about hiring: 1) what’s the biggest mistake companies make in hiring employees; and 2) what’s the biggest legal obstacle employers face in hiring? Here’s what to do about background screening.

HR Management: Think Like a Sales Pro to Recruit the Best Talent — One-size-fits-all approach to recruiting employees is not a strategy. You and your peers in human resources might be enamored with technology, but job candidates want more focus on the personal touch. That necessitates thinking like a sales professional.

13 Management Tips to Solve Employee Absenteeism — Absenteeism causes migraines for a lot of bosses. Obviously, your company will make healthier profits, if you don’t have an absenteeism problem.

“I hire people brighter than me and then I get out of their way.”

-Leo Lacocca


__________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy David Castillo Dominici at www.freedigitalphotos.net

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Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.