Winning in Branding, Sales – The 6 Key Characteristics of a Logo



One key element for a company’s branding and sales that often gets short shrift is a great logo. Whether you’re an entrepreneur entering a brave new world or an established company needing profits, a great logo helps ensure top-of-mind awareness.

A great logo can make the difference between winning and losing in a competitive marketplace.

To win with a world-class logo, here are the six key characteristics:

Uniqueness means telling your story.

Some companies, such as Intel, have been ingenious in creating a logo with sound — the famous Intel “bong.”

The 2015 video explains the history of the Intel bong.

You want to stand out against your competition. Additionally, like Intel, create your own fonts to distinguish your logo from others.

And yes, you want a memorable logo, but the last thing you want is negative publicity and the expense of a lawsuit.

Keep it fresh.

Look into the future. Your logo needs to be timeless in the face of changing times.

It’s not always possible – sometimes logos need to be fine-tuned because of developing trends. If you decide to update your logo be sure, though, to keep the same basic concept (customers long remember a great logo).

Simplicity works.

Don’t get too cute. A logo needs to be simple to be memorable. Here’s a trite phrase but apropos – “Less is more.”

Simplicity is necessary so you can also use your logo as a favicon.  A favicon is shown in the address bar of every browser, and will help to level your playing field with bigger companies. (A favicon is briefly explained among the eight best practices in small business marketing.)

Be artistic for visual appeal.

Professionalism is important to avoid the look of being poorly planned. You want balance in color and fonts that don’t clash with your objective.

A logo design should coincide with your targeting.

Style, fonts and colors might be appropriate for one industry and profession, they aren’t suitable for others. A whimsical style is not suitable for professional service firms. And it must look good with your slogan.

It should be adaptable.

Flexibility is important. There are occasions when you’ll to display your logo in different ways – whether it’s for a black-and-white motif, a small logo on business cards or a large rendition on a sign at a store location.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are more marketing tips:

Overview: Marketing Plan Essentials For Best Results — If you haven’t completed a strong marketing plan to complement your business plan, you’re missing salient benefits and your plan needs four specifics.

Strategies, Precautions When Expanding into a New Market — Whether you’re expanding across town or a different region, there are risks to anticipate in alleviating any uncertainty.

Critical Essentials to Develop the Best Marketing Formula — There are critical essentials for marketing, which includes the right channels and developing the right message. That includes the right branding slogan and logo. Unless your targeting upscale consumers, many consumers prefer value marketing — not cute, which doesn’t necessarily mean selling at a lower price than your competitors. Hyper-consumerism is history. Humor is great, but more importantly, traditional values with a purpose are in vogue.

14 Steps to Profit from Online Customer Reviews — For competitiveness and profits, businesses can’t afford to ignore the potential of online reviews. They’re a factor in revolutionizing commerce. Reviews are important because they influence prospective customers to buy from you. They’re also beneficial in improving your Internet presence because search-engine crawlers consider them to be relevant.

How Mobile Strategies Are Most Effective with Cross-Channel Marketing — Businesses are increasingly using mobile apps to sell products, but the most successful know how best. They use cross-channel marketing tools.

“Your goal is not to make an image. It’s to make a statement!”

– Tom Asacker


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




The Correlation: A Simple Logo and Branding Success





Some of the world’s most-successful companies have simple logos. That’s the conclusion from a study by a UK logo-design company, Small Business Logos.

It conducted the 2012 study — with timeless results — listing the top-10 logos in different sectors from technology to shoes.

“Creating a strong, memorable logo can really enhance the success of your business,” said Lucy Smith, marketing and eCommerce director for Small Business Logos. She was quoted in Computer Business Review (CBR) in “Your business logo will make or break you.”

In surveying business owners, the study covered sectors from technology to retailing.

It was designed to help UK businesspeople to realize the value in selecting a logo for branding success.

Certainly, the study is applicable in the U.S.

A simple logo as a favicon is important for use in a search engine presentation (for a brief explanation about favicons, see the eight best practices in small business marketing).

After all, for profits, size doesn’t matter but image and professionalism count.

“We’ve taken a close look at what made our top ten to help businesses make informed choices when it comes to their own branding,” CBR quoted Ms. Smith. “Simplicity and the ability to reproduce in a range of different sizes, media and on products, is key.”

Along with an explanation of each, here are the study’s top-10 logos:

  1. Apple: Clean, modern and extremely easy to reproduce
  2. BBC: Simple, memorable and works well on TV, online and in-print
  3. Nike: Suggestive of movement, ideal for a sports brand, and works well on the side of a trainer
  4. Amazon: Embodying the company’s philosophy: everything from A to Z, delivered with a smile
  5. Google: Strong primary colours, enhanced by ‘Google doodles’
  6. London Underground: The capital’s most instantly recognised logo, the shape recalling the tube’s tunnels
  7. UPS: Brown is symbolic of parcel paper, with the shield suggesting security
  8. American Express: Squares and block lettering indicate strength and trust
  9. Sky: A versatile logo that supports brand extension: SkyNews, SkyHD, SkyMovies, etc.
  10. HSBC: The only logo in the top 10 to use a very traditional serif font, more commonly associated with business and finance, suggesting authority

From the Coach’s Corner, related topics:

Checklist to Build Your Brand on a Budget — Branding is very important. It really helps to build your brand on a budget. Nebulous branding is a leading cause of business failure. Besides ill-defined branding, when a business fails there are several likely reasons. They include poor planning, insufficient passion, ineffective management, weak finances, undesirable location, and ineffective use of technology. A solid brand will help you land customers and insure customer loyalty.

Marketing Checklist to Measure Your Brand’s Personality — You’ll be smiling after you successfully use this checklist.   Here are two key questions about your marketing: 1. How much have you invested in your brand and personality? 2. How’s it working?  These are important questions. However, many companies – large, medium and small – can’t accurately answer the questions. That’s especially true regarding their return on investment. Yet, ROI is critical to measure.

Action Steps To Get Top Results From Your Marketing Plan — Why do seemingly great marketing plans fail to yield the desired results? Well, one reason: Such plans don’t turn the ideas into reality because they’re not action-oriented. What counts is the scheduled specific footwork, and then tracking the results. There’s a second reason, quality of execution. There are five action steps for success.

Critical Essentials to Develop the Best Marketing Formula — There are critical essentials for marketing, which includes the right channels and developing the right message. That includes the right branding slogan and logo. Unless your targeting upscale consumers, many consumers prefer value marketing — not cute, which doesn’t necessarily mean selling at a lower price than your competitors. Hyper-consumerism is history. Humor is great, but more importantly, traditional values with a purpose are in vogue. Why? Consumer attitudes are changing.

Rock in Your Marketing Messages with 5 Writing Tips — In this digital age of consumer overload, words are powerful – if they’re used strategically. The challenge is to help your prospective customers quickly understand your message. Of course, they hear and see thousands of messages everyday: Road signs; store signage; radio and TV commercials; conversations at work, home and with friends in-person or the telephone; social media; e-mails; as well as ads and articles in newspapers and on the Internet. Here’s how your messages can be seen and heard for results.

“What”s a brand? A singular idea or concept that you own inside the mind of the prospect.”

– Al Ries

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry. 




Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.