With Fraud Running Rampant, How HR Can Help Prevent It


By taking alert measures, human resources can play a major role to put a dent in the global epidemic of fraud in the workplace.

An authoritative study reveals more than $6.3 billion in actual losses from occupational fraud in 2,410 cases.

The median loss of in fraud cases was $150,000, according to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) in 2016. Some larger organizations suffered from multiple cases of fraud.

ACFE says the actual fraud losses in the aggregate total in the trillions of dollars.

The typical company suffers a five percent loss in revenue.

Investigators say human resources can help in the fight against fraud with comprehensive pre-hiring background checks including senior managers, as well as being on guard for unusual behavior of workers and using other tactics.

HR managerFrom the most common to the least common, ACFE outlines three broad categories of fraud:

— “Asset misappropriation” such as stealing of cash, equipment and information which includes billing schemes, cash larceny, check tampering, false expenses, phony disbursements, and payroll fraud.

— “Corruption fraud” includes conflict of interest, and bribery and extortion.

— “Financial statement fraud.”

Executive fraud

Executives committed 18.9 percent of the fraud with a median loss of $703,000. They are able to evade controls more easily than other employees.

Managers were responsible for 35.8 percent with a median loss of $173,000.

Subordinates committed 40.9 percent for a median loss of $65,000.

Sixty-nine percent were male fraudsters with a median loss of $187,000. While women fraudsters accounted for a median loss of $100,000.

About half of the wrongdoers had been with their employers for more than five years. Their median loss was $240.000.

Fifty-five percent were between 31 and 45 years old. Those over 40 were accountable for a $250,000 median loss.

Sixty-one percent had a college degree or higher and committed a median loss of $207,000. Less educated fraudsters had a $100,000 median loss.

Early detection

HR can help prevent fraud by being on the lookout for six so-called red flags in behavior of the workforce.

Behavioral red flags include:

  1. Living beyond means – 45.8 percent of the cases
  2. Financial difficulties – 30 percent
  3. Unusually close relationships with vendors or customers – 20.1 percent
  4. Excessive control issues – 15.3 percent
  5. A “wheeler-dealer” attitude involving unscrupulous behavior – 15.3 percent
  6. Recent divorce or family problems – 13.4 percent

In addition to effective financial controls and extensive background checks, ACFE recommends fraud hotlines, job rotation, mandatory vacations, fraud training, and support programs.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related resources:

Embezzlement: Guidelines to Uncover and Prevent it — Embezzlement is a widespread nightmare. Here are proven strategies to discover embezzlement, and to prevent from occurring.

Embezzlement Tips to Protect Your Nonprofit or Company Assets —  Embezzlement is a widespread nightmare in business and the public sector. If you surf the Internet using the key word, embezzlement, you’ll find seemingly countless headlines. Upper management commits 18 percent of fraud, according to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) in 2010. ACFE also said accounting department employees commit 29 percent of fraud.

10 Unusual Prevention Tips to Effectively Fight Fraud — If you ever think you might be victimized by fraud, you probably are. Businesspeople are typically victimized by fraud in several ways. The causes will surprise you. Here are simple ways to prevent fraud.

Beware: Small Businesses Lose Trillions to Worker Fraud — Small companies are fleeced by an aggregate in the trillions of dollars from employee fraud — suggesting the need for financial controls.

HR — Avoid the 10 Most Common Background Screening Gaffes — In human resources, all background checks are not equal. It’s important to avoid the 10 most-common background-screening errors.

Risk Management in Hiring: Pre-Employment Screening Tips — Here are two questions about hiring: 1) what’s the biggest mistake companies make in hiring employees; and 2) what’s the biggest legal obstacle employers face in hiring? Here’s what to do about background screening

Best Management/HR Tips: Check References of Applicants — Even if you believe you’ve found an impeccable candidate, you must conduct precise reference checks. If you don’t, you risk paying a high price later.

Legal HR Issues? Best Practices in Workplace Investigations — As an employer, one of your biggest nightmares can be issues involving your employees. There can be many reasons to conduct an investigation. “Action expresses priorities,” said Mohandas Gandhi. So you should act quickly.

“The challenge for capitalism is that the things that breed trust also breed the environment for fraud.”

-James Surowiecki


__________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





The New Face of $1 Trillion in Cybercrime on Business – Account Takeovers, Credit Card Fraud



Business Web sites are facing an increasingly intense full-court press from cybercriminals – the aggregate cost of cybercrime annually, which includes prevention strategies, has exceeded $1 trillion.

Large-scale data breaches are savagely victimizing new accounts while account takeover attempts and credit card fraud has doubled, according to a fraud-data study in June 2013 .

A report by ThreatMetrix shows that Web fraud attacks endanger the full customer life-cycle: New account registration, authentication and payment transactions. ThreatMetrix (www.ThreatMetrix.com) is a provider of cybercrime prevention solutions. The study included the experiences of 9,000 the firm’s customers.

“Nearly one in every 10 new accounts opened online is done using a spoofed identity, and the incidence of account takeover attempts and online payments fraud have both doubled in a six-month period,” said Alisdair Faulkner, the ThreatMetrix chief products officer.

“Data breaches are imminent and given the increased sophistication of malware, organizations should assume that a material percentage of their customers and user accounts are either compromised or criminal and invest accordingly,” he added.

He said attacks on new account registrations using spoofed and synthetic identities saw the highest rate of attacks followed by account logins and payment fraud. About 10 percent of online services originate from a cybercriminal.

New account registrations include applying for new lines of credit, creating a profile on a social networking site or marketplace and enrolling in an authentication scheme.

Mr. Faulkner said the most common form of stolen identities is by human or bot-generated fraud attacks directed through proxies and Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) intended to disguise the true origin of the attacker. These bypass IP address-based geo filter blacklists that also have the downside of unknowingly blocking legitimate visitors.

“The economic impact of these attacks varies by industry,” he added. “However, the common thread is that without automated visibility into the true device, persona, relationship and global behavior, the only alternative is additional verification roadblocks put in front of legitimate customers and extended review and hold-out periods.”

Payments Fraud

Payments fraud attempts, which include online credit card transactions and money transfers, increased from 3.1 percent to 6.4 percent over the six months ending in March 2013.

Mr. Faulkner explained the trends:

  • Sophisticated credit card cyber gangs adopting banking malware, normally used to hijack bank accounts, to steal full credit card information from customers as a fake verification step when attempting to log into a bank account
  • Increase in percentage of digital goods sold by ThreatMetrix customers that historically have a higher incidence of attack
  • The increased availability and adoption of free and commercial VPN services and the growing use of Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) providers by cybercriminals to set up ad hoc tunneling protocols. VPNs are favored by cybercriminals because they are impervious to proxy piercing technologies and undetected by traditional IP proxy detection services.

Account Takeover

Based on data taken from October 2012 through March 2013, ThreatMetrix customers saw account takeover attempts nearly double (168 percent). These types of attacks have traditionally focused on banking and brokerage sites, but have recently escalated across e-commerce sites that store credit card details and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) companies that hold valuable customer data that do not yet have the heightened level of protection as banking sites.

ThreatMetrix has seen a rise in the sophistication of account takeover attempts using blended attacks to exploit companies that do not have an integrated solution for malware, device identification and bot protection.

They include:

  • Multi-stage malware exploits: Malware, typically using Man-in-the-Browser (MitB) Trojans, is used to extract login and setup verification credentials from a customer that is then used by a separate device or third party to avoid server-side MitB detection capabilities.
  • Multi-stage scripted attack exploits: Automated bot attacks test previously breached credentials from third-party sites, exploiting that many people reuse user names and passwords. After checking account balances or verifying whether an account has a stored credit card, a second attack is launched, typically done manually, to avoid any server-side bot detection.

Whew. So that’s more evidence that businesses need to be diligent in operating their Web sites and preparing with precautions and response philosophy.

Not only that, but most small businesses make you vulnerable to credit card fraud and identity theft.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are more IT resource links:

“If you spend more on coffee than on IT security, you will be hacked. What’s more, you deserve to be hacked.”

Richard Clarke

__________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.  

8 Tips to Stop Healthcare, Insurance Inefficiency and Fraud



Inefficiency and fraud in healthcare and insurance has generated a ton of headlines. So a discussion about inefficiency and fraud has to include all stakeholders. 
That means patients, doctors and insurance companies – all must get a square deal for the healthcare system to work.

Firstly, it appears doctors are experiencing unnecessary challenges.

The Supreme Court rulings on ObamaCare didn’t solve anything for doctors – the undesirable law continues to remain a challenge to doctors in multiple ways. This also means ramifications for you as a patient.

Doctors are stressed by decreasing reimbursements for patient care by insurance companies, Medicare and Medicaid.

ID-10033362 photostockTrue, some doctors, who have good instincts, are better than others. It’s not uncommon for a patient to be misdiagnosed only to get a differing diagnosis from a different doctor.

This underscores the need for diagnostic proof in order for them to get paid, and explains why some doctors order more expensive tests than others.

Then, there are the decisions by health insurance companies adversely affecting doctors – interfering in doctor-patient relationships by dictating care, fees and inflexible fraud regulations.

Doctors and hospitals must spend too much time and resources on paperwork. Insurance companies are only doing what they feel is best to stay in business.

It’s not uncommon for doctors to decline to treat Medicaid patients – affordability is an issue for 31 percent of doctors. They aren’t accepting patients insured by the federal-state insurance program, according to the publication, Health Affairs.

Doctors are turning new Medicare patients. They’re only paid 40 cents on the dollar.

How ObamaCare increases costs

You might recall that the Obama Administration and other proponents promised that more low-income patients will get healthcare. However, with 31 percent of doctors now declining Medicaid patients, such patients have to spend extra time and money to find a primary healthcare provider. 

ObamaCare means costs will continue to increase. Why? ObamaCare is mandating that insurance companies accept everyone – no matter what.

Many such patients will only purchase healthcare when they absolutely need it – not before. The IRS penalty for being uninsured is less costly than the cost of premiums.

Because patients will wait too long to buy coverage, Medicare, Medicaid and insurance companies will have to continue increasing premiums – translating into higher costs for healthcare and insurance.

But the healthcare problem will worsen:

ObamaCare’s $716 billion in cuts in Medicare payment to providers – doctors and hospitals – threaten their livelihoods. Their only hope is for an increase in Medicaid patients. However, many states have already announced they will not participate in the expansion of Medicaid.

Fraud prevention

At first glance, one good provision in ObamaCare is an increased emphasis on prevention of Medicare and Medicaid fraud.

Published reports indicate Medicare fraud is in excess of $60 billion. The fraud is largely perpetrated by supply houses and furtive brokers.

For instance in 2011, the nation’s fraud-detection system cost $77 million. There’s also new fraud-command center costing $3.6 million, which doesn’t include the expense of fraud investigators across the U.S.

The fraud enforcement system has its detractors. Over the last six months of 2011, the system only prevented one check, in the amount of $7,591, from being paid to con artists.

So Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Tom Coburn (R-OK) wrote a letter to Dept. of Human and Health Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. They asked her to stop spending money on the system until it can become efficient. Their concerns were ignored.

Eight tips to prevent fraud

Fraud affects all of us – patients, doctors, taxpayers and the federal government.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation recommends these fraud-prevention tips:

1. Never sign blank insurance claim forms.

2. Never give blanket authorization to a medical provider to bill for services rendered.

3. Ask your medical providers what they will charge and what you will be expected to pay out-of-pocket.

4. Carefully review your insurer’s Explanation of Benefits (EOB) statement. Make sure you actually received the treatments for which your insurance was charged, and question suspicious expenses.

5. Do not do business with sales people door-to-door or over the phone who tell you that services of medical equipment are free.

6. Give your insurance/Medicare identification only to those who have provided you with medical services.

7. Keep accurate records of all health care appointments.

8. Know if your physician ordered equipment for you.

From the Coach’s Corner, also see:

“There are three things in the world that deserve no mercy, hypocrisy, fraud, and tyranny.
-Frederick William Robertson

 __________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry. 

Photo courtesy of photostock at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Beware: Small Businesses Lose Trillions to Worker Fraud



Fraud is reaching epidemic proportions at small companies, which are fleeced by an aggregate $2.9 trillion. That’s the estimate in a 2011 study from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE).

ACFE reports the median loss is $150,000, or 5 percent of the annual revenue. Some 30 percent of the companies have 100 or fewer workers. To add insult to the proverbial injury for such businesses, 25 percent of the persons responsible for the fraud had been trusted employees for at least 10 years.

Credit and cash challenged employees in the  economy is partially attributed as a cause for the epic fraud numbers.

Unfortunately, some long-time employees seem to have a sense of entitlement when working at small companies that probably pay less than large firms.

Small companies are probably more trusting of workers and are likely less sophisticated in financial controls while being focused on marketing for survival.

ACFE indicates it takes a company about a year and a half before discovering the shortages. More than 85 percent of the perpetrators didn’t have records of committing fraud.

The fraud trend suggests the need for financial controls and insurance protection against losses. That means taking steps to prevent such opportunities among your accountant, bookkeeper, office manager, sales manager – anyone who might have access from your billing records to checking account.

It also means getting an outside participant to review your finances, and explaining your controls to your insurance company. Your insurer will likely have suggestions, and provide premium discounts as a result of your financial controls.

Yes, marketing and other issues are problematic in this economy, so stay focused on them, but secure your finances, too.

From the Coach’s Corner, as is the custom on these pages, we typically discuss the solutions to problems.

Here are resource links to actually prevent fraud:

Embezzlement Tips to Protect Your Nonprofit or Company Assets —  Embezzlement is a widespread nightmare in business and the public sector. If you surf the Internet using the key word, embezzlement, you’ll find seemingly countless headlines. Upper management commits 18 percent of fraud, according to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) in 2010. ACFE also said accounting department employees commit 29 percent of fraud.

Liars and Cheats – Clues You’re Dealing with a ‘Pinocchio’ in Business — Italian writer Carlo Collodi probably had no idea what he was starting in 1883 when he wrote the children’s novel, The Adventures of Pinocchio. It was the story about a woodcarver who created a wooden puppet that wanted to become a real boy. Pinocchio’s short nose would grow longer whenever he told a lie.

The New Face of $1 Trillion in Cybercrime on Business – Account Takeovers, Credit Card Fraud — Business Web sites are facing an increasingly intense full-court press from cybercriminals – the aggregate cost of cybercrime annually, which includes prevention strategies, has exceeded $1 trillion. Large-scale data breaches are savagely victimizing new accounts while account takeover attempts and credit card fraud has doubled, according to a fraud-data study in June 2013 .

Strategies for Retailers to Prevent E-Commerce Fraud — Merchants are certainly aware of online fraud and 65 percent are trying to fight it, but their efforts aren’t working according to a study. The anti-fraud study was conducted by CardNotPresent.com and SignatureLink in 2012.

Identity Fraud Escalates in Smartphones, Social Media — Skyrocketing mobile malware threats amid widespread use of BYOD, bring your own devices, will lead to a $1.88 billion services market in 2013. That’s according to ABI Research. Cybercriminals are successfully attacking vulnerabilities in individual devices and networks to an ABI report.

11 Travel Tips – Save Money, Prevent against Cyber Theft, Fraud — The most vulnerable travelers are businesspeople. That’s because they have to use Internet and e-mail. They’re in danger expressly from vulnerabilities, such as from wirelessly accessible passports to using WIFI.

Security Steps for Your Mobile Device in Online Banking, Purchases — Almost 90 percent of Americans use a cell phone and more than 50 percent have smartphones, according to published reports. They also indicate 28 percent of smartphone owners use their devices for online banking.

“Trust, but verify.”

-Ronald Reagan


__________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




11 Travel Tips – Save Money, Prevent against Cyber Theft, Fraud



The most vulnerable travelers are businesspeople. That’s because they have to use Internet and e-mail.

They’re in danger expressly from vulnerabilities, such as from wirelessly accessible passports to using WIFI.

To save you from aggravation and money losses, here are 11 quick tips:

1. There are no free meals.

The adage is applicable to offerings that appear too good to be true. If you get a unique travel offer, do your due diligence.

Scan Internet news pages for scams. It wouldn’t hurt to check the site of the airline trade organization, International Air Transport Association, www.iata.org.

2. Watch for offers from fakes.

Cybercriminals are prevalent in the travel industry, and are publishing sites that look like the real, well-known companies.

3. Don’t use social media to chat about your travel plans.

Don’t alert criminals. Your home-front and business will be vulnerable.

4. Cautions about debit and credit cards.

Unlike debit cards, credit cards protect against fraud and theft. Better yet, before you travel obtain a no-foreign transaction fee card, be sure to alert your credit card company about your trip.

Just in case you might need help on your trip, get the credit-card issuers’ number that you can telephone collect when you’re overseas. Actually, before you travel, click here to see six must-do financial precautions.

5. Guard against currency conversion surprises.

Don’t sign any checks or receipts that aren’t shown in the local currency. Overseas merchants sometimes try to manipulate travelers – they provide their prices in U.S. currency, not their local currency.

6. Be prepared to utilize your passport when making a purchase.

Reputable foreign merchants don’t trust your credit card unless you have acceptable identification. That’s because U.S. credit cards have the old-fashioned magnetic stripe on the back. European credit cards use the chip-and-pin system, which is a modern fraud-security system.

7. Use your own computer.

For data security and privacy, never use public computers. When traveling overseas, you must take four steps to defend against hackers.

 8. Forget WIFI.

Don’t use WIFI. It’s not just a matter of cybercriminals viewing your computers. They’re establishing fake access points, which can give them an entrée to your important files and data.

If you have to use a computer, hook your computer to your smartphone’s service or try MIFI.

9. Protect your e-passport.

They have RFID chips containing your personal information. Cybercriminals can view your information even though you can’t see them. So use an RFID blocking passport.

10. Bluetooth has vulnerabilities.

So turn it off. ”

Wherever you are, cybercriminals use software to intercept your Bluetooth signal to hack into your phone (see these Tips to Prevent Hacking of Your Bluetooth).

11. Think twice about using in-flight mobile phone and SMS services.

They’re just as risky as a WIFI hotspot.

Use these tips to help insure you enjoy your trip and to transact some good business.

Finally, see GlobalEdge,  a site with helpful research information at http://globaledge.msu.edu/.

From the Coach’s Corner, related travel tips:

Travel — How to Avoid Foreign Currency-Exchange Fees — When traveling abroad for vacation or business, foreign currency-exchange fees can get costly for thrifty-minded people. There are steps you can take to avoid extra fees in exchanging currency. The pitfalls to avoid range from using airport exchange tables to using credit cards that surcharge the purchase of products and services.

Take Your Business Globally with These 12 Tips — If you want to export your products to the international marketplace, keep in mind and implement 12 steps. They include: 1. Begin on a small scale in an English-speaking country. Unless you speak other languages fluently, begin in a nation where English is spoken. Identify the country where your product will be in demand.

 If you don’t know where you are going, any road will lead you there.

 

__________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy of Ambro at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Will Goldman’s Scandal Prompt Cultural Changes on Wall Street?



There were reasons for financial reforms.

On the same day  that Congress passed sweeping financial-reform legislation in 2010, Goldman Sachs & Co. agreed to pay $550 million to settle fraud charges. The charges accused Goldman of fraud in mortgage investments. That includes $300 million in fines assessed by the Security and Exchange Commission – the largest in SEC history.

The remaining balance of $250 million went to the victims.

profits-618373_1280You might recall that Goldman’s mortgage-related investments were designed with participation by a Goldman client, Paulson & Co. Paulson bet those investments would not succeed, and they didn’t.

Goldman was forced to assess its procedures in such financial mortgage deals. The catalyst was the investments that cost investors nearly $1 billion, but the deal netted Paulson huge sums of money. It was also part of the mega mortgage meltdown that helped to exacerbate the nation’s economic downturn.

“This settlement is a stark lesson to Wall Street firms that no product is too complex, and no investor too sophisticated, to avoid a heavy price if a firm violates the fundamental principles of honest treatment and fair dealing,” said Robert Khuzami, the SEC’s enforcement director.

The case against Goldman gathered steam when a published report added impetus to fraud allegations against Goldman. The Sacramento Bee alleged Goldman secretly worked to dump “billions of dollars in risky mortgage securities and buy exotic insurance” in anticipation of the housing bubble. But the report said Goldman hid its actions from the Securities and Exchange Commission for nine months in 2007 (“Goldman didn’t disclose its subprime mortgage hedges”).

Goldman’s gambling

At issue: Opponents eventually proved that Goldman’s gambling was so relevant – investors would not have bought Goldman’s offerings.

The furor over that controversial 2007 mortgage derivatives deal still underscores the fear of many Americans that the market is rigged against them because Wall Street is a haven for questionable behavior.

The Security and Exchange Commission’s triumph over Goldman’s handling of the collateralized debt obligation (CDO) in subprime mortgages showed the Wall Street sheriff is back and is flexing some muscles.

Furthermore, Goldman’s failure to disclose that a hedge fund manager, John Paulson, helped select the underlying securities and then bet against them to make more than $1 billion is bad enough.

Goldman hid investigation

It’s looked even worse after Bloomberg reported Goldman knew it was under investigation for nine months but failed to disclose the investigation in their financial reports to investors.

Such omissions triggered the shareholder legal action.

The resulting headlines are reminiscent of the financial-greed scandals involving the 1980’s shadowy behavior of convicts Mike Milken and Ivan Boesky, as well as the principals at Enron and Worldcom.

Several questions have arisen:

  1. Is the SEC action really the tip of the iceberg of upcoming legal challenges?
  2. Will it lead to a stock market correction?
  3. Will it end the entitlement attitudes seemingly held by many investment bankers?
  4. Will it improve the culture in the financial sector?

This case was an ideal situation for New York’s litigious community.

It led to a decline of Goldman shares – 13 percent – as well as the shares of other financial companies trading in CDOs, including Deutsche Bank AG, Morgan Stanley, Bank of America (the parent of Merrill Lynch) and Citigroup.

Widespread conflicts of interest

In addition, a Chicago online publication, ProPublica, reported on questionable bets by Magnetar and allegations of conflicts of interest by the latter three financial firms. Magnetar denied culpability and none of the three banks denied or commented on the allegations.

Indeed, the same day that the SEC acted against Goldman, a Dutch bank leveled similar charges against Merrill Lynch. Cooperatieve Centrale Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank BA, or Rabobank, cited Merrill Lynch in a $1.5 billion CDO.

Sadly, regarding Wall Street’s entitlement attitudes and culture, the consequences might not be severe enough to prompt an attitude adjustment.

Not to be cynical, here’s the bottom-line question: Are there enough moral compasses on Wall Street to put a stop to the chicanery? Probably not.

From the Coach’s Corner, a few more Wall Street-related articles:

Major Banks Are Too Big to Fail, But Not to Break Them Up — The time has come to break up the big banks. There are 5,000+ banks in the U.S. However, just a dozen of them dominate with 69 percent of the assets in the banking sector.

Federal Reserve Typifies What’s Wrong with Economy — There’s still a troubling schism in U.S. politics, monetary policy and management of the economy. The Federal Reserve keeps printing money, which risks inflation and only encourages more bad monetary policy. For another example, consider Bloomberg ‘s shocking expose: “Wall Street Aristocracy Got $1.2 Trillion in Loans from Fed.” Yes, $1.2 trillion in secrecy.

How Twitter Levels the Playing Field for Small Cap Companies — Good news for venture capitalists and entrepreneurs who are known to kvetch that that their companies fall below the radar screen of Wall Street analysts and the media. It’s widely known that mainstream media coverage seems to favor large companies over small ones. It’s a valid concern.

“The saddest thing I can imagine is to get used to luxury”

-Charlie Chaplin

__________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.

Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.