Why Women Are Better Prepared than Men for Management



Are you in the hunt for a management job or do you want to become a stronger manager?

Keep in mind that emotional intelligence (EI) is a desired characteristic for people to become successful managers.

Why?

ID-100106729EI is the capacity to recognize – taken an inventory, if you will – and manage your personal emotions as well as dealing with the emotions of others.

But again, you must know and handle your own emotions first – to bring the best out of yourself – before you can be effective in bringing the best in others.

If you’re having a bad-hair day, you still must correct your own emotions in order to be effectively focused in your thinking in order to solve problems and to promote profitability.

Theoretically, many women inherently have these skills and are better equipped for management.

That’s confirmed by a study of 55,000 professionals in 90 countries from 2011 to 2015.

Women surpass men in 11 of 12 in EI-expertise categories, says a study from the Hay Group of consulting firm, Korn Ferry.

Gender equality

“The data suggests a strong need for more women in the workforce to take on leadership roles,” says Korn Ferry’s Daniel Goleman.

“When you factor in the correlation between high emotional intelligence and those leaders who deliver better business results, there is a strong case for gender equity,” he explains.

“Organizations must find ways to identify women who score highly on these competencies and empower them,” he advises.

People quit their boss, not their job.

Key findings:

— Women are 86 percent are more likely to exercise emotional self-awareness.

— 18.4 percent of women exhibit self-awareness vis-à-vis 9.9 percent of men.

— Women are 45 percent more inclined to be empathetic.

— Women are 9 percent more likely to have a positive outlook.

— Women also seem to be better in adaptability, coaching and mentoring, inspirational leadership, conflict management, organizational awareness, and teamwork and achievement orientation.

Naturally, managers with EI have a better chance to retain employees, lead them to high performance, and profitability.

Conversely, managers with weak EI fail to deliver such benefits.

From the Coach’s Corner, editor’s picks for articles with tips for effective management:

How to Grow Your EI for Leadership Success — Emotional intelligence (EI) is important for communication and leadership. A person who has EI is able to evaluate, understand, and control emotions.

21st Century Leadership Requires Authenticity — Here’s how — It’s one thing to be promoted into a management role, but it’s entirely another to be regarded as a leader to inspire a company’s culture. What really matters is knowing how you impact others.

To Win in Project Management, Tap Emotional Intelligence — Automated project-management models might be popular, but they don’t lead to the championship-quality results. Project managers achieve greater success and long-term sustainability by leveraging emotional intelligence.

7 Tactics to Enjoy Your Job Managing Difficult Employees — With a difficult employee, you have two obvious problems – the impacts on your organization and the behavior of the individual. Here’s how to love your job even when managing difficult employees.

Strategic HR Management for Retaining High Performers — You must build your organizational capabilities if you want to create an environment that will retain high performers. The way to accomplish it is to be committed to strong results with specialized retention initiatives for your talent.

5 Quick Management Tips to Motivate Your Employees — A major quandary for managers is to bring out the best in their employees. Every manager wants to do it, but it’s not always easy. What’s the reason? Usually, it’s because employees are disengaged – disconnected from their managers and companies. Here’s how to fix it.

People quit their boss, not their job.


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy imagerymajestic at www.freedigitalphotos.net


Cold Calling – What You Can Do to Get Their Attention



If you’re a small business owner struggling in sales, you can learn lessons from salespeople who cold-call your business.

If you think about it, you’re probably put off by salespeople for some very simple reasons.

“What?” you ask.

Subconsciously, it might be a case of your “feelings of transference” — your unconscious redirection of feelings. Yes, you’re often annoyed for the same reasons prospects have ignored your sales calls. Why?

ID-100301062 adamrConsider:

Most prospect calls are ignored because they’re made at illogical, inconvenient times.

Salespeople are unwittingly rude.

They’re guilty of making poor elevator pitches.

They don’t research the prospects well enough to pitch the right services or products.

Emotional intelligence

Great salespeople understand human nature to create and capitalize on sales opportunities.

In other words, people are successful in prospecting when they have emotional intelligence (EI).

EI enables a person to perceive emotion, the ability to reason by effectively using emotions, the ability to understand emotion and the ability to manage emotions.

Put in other ways:

Successful salespeople have EI – the ability to understand and respond to the emotions of prospects. In their prospects, they discern tones of voice, body language and facial expressions.

By productive thinking, they prioritize how to proceed in their prospecting. If they are having a bad-hair day, they manage their emotions.

Sales result from having enthusiasm and a positive outlook. You need to regulate your emotions and to respond effectively to the emotions of others.

“All learning has an emotional base.”
-Plato

If your sales pipeline is empty and you’re desperate for sales, you probably have nothing to lose by launching an all-out sales blitz.

Otherwise, make the most of your time, emotions, and energy by using your EI.

EI timing

Successful prospectors know that timing is important. They respect their prospects’ time and consideration.

Generally, the best times to cold-call people you don’t know are either early or late mornings; and in the early and late afternoons.

The best days to prospect are midweek. Mondays and Fridays are often taboo. In this economy, prospects are swamped on Mondays in starting their workweek.

On Fridays, prospects are either tired from a long week or getting ready to leave for the weekend. Many successful decision-makers take long weekends. Actually, it’s likely they’re not even at the office on Mondays and Fridays.

Other bad times to cold call, the week before and after a major holiday.

There are also taboos for prospecting on certain industries, for example: Don’t call on restaurant owners at lunch time for an obvious reason. Don’t approach car dealers the day following a major car sale – they’re busy trying to close their sales.

If you’re unsuccessful in reaching a prospect on a Tuesday, change your approach and cold-call the person the following Wednesday.

Don’t be desperate – wait five business days before cold-calling a prospect again.

Getting past gatekeepers

Getting past receptionists and other gatekeepers is a universal challenge for salespeople, but it’s a must. Read the room and become friends with the receptionist.

Successful salespeople know the secrets for getting by receptionists and other gatekeepers.

By building a rapport with the receptionist, you might get some important clues about the company.

The receptionist can also tip you off on urgent information. Perhaps the prospect is involved in a tense meeting, such as disciplining or terminating an employee. Or perhaps there’s a death in the family.

If you get an introduction to the prospect, ask the person’s permission before launching your pitch. For example, “Do you have a minute to hear…?”

From the Coach’s Corner, editor’s picks for related information:

For Strong Sales, How and Why to Cold Call Prospects — Are you lacking in sales? Do you get enough face time with the right prospects? Here’s how and why in-person cold calls will help you make sales.

6 Tips to Create New Sales with Successful Cold Calling — Attending mere networking events or depending on a high marketing budget aren’t sufficient for strong sales. OK, cold calling isn’t always easy, but you must if you want to dramatically increase sales in double-digit percentages. Develop and implement the right strategies. You’ll be in the all-important groove for a happy buying environment.

You Will Overcome Cold Calling Anxiety Using 5 Strategies — One of the worst pieces of advice for business owners and salespeople is don’t cold call. That’s a very short-sighted idea. Cold calling is very effective in footwork to generate revenue.

7 Tips for Setting B2B Appointments with CEOs — As every salesperson knows, face time with B2B prospects gives you a foundation for sales success. Execution in the appointment-setting process is, of course, is key to being successful.

For Top Sales, 5 Rules for Targeting the Right Prospects — If you target the right prospects, you’ll save time and money and increase your revenue. There are five rules to follow. They’re developed for B2B but work for B2C, too. 

“All learning has an emotional base.”
-Plato


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.



How to Grow Your EI for Leadership Success



Emotional intelligence (EI) is important for communication and leadership. A person who has EI is able to evaluate, understand, and control emotions.

If you have EI, chances are you can better relate to the emotions of others.

There is disagreement over whether EI can be learned or whether people are born with it. In my experience, EI can be learned.

ID-10040848 AmbroEI helps on both the macro and micro levels. If you want a high performing company, focus on EI. If you want to accelerate your career, strengthen your EI. Why?

There’s a link between EI and leadership. Whether you’re a senior manager or a young salesperson, EI provides the spark to accelerate your accomplishments.

Executives with high EI tend to have happier employees. They hire and promote employees who these soft skills.

This means the staff members are higher performing and aren’t as likely to leave.

Moreover, companies that base their recruitment, hiring and promotion initiatives on EI will be more competitive in the marketplace.

Whether you want EI to work for your company or you personally, it’s desirable to have five key characteristics:

1. Check for self-awareness

This means being aware of emotions – what we’re feeling, the causes of our feelings and how we react to others. If we’re fully aware of our feelings, we can manage our emotions.

We then respond, not react to others. This is vital. It’s advisable to think about what to say or do before acting – that’s called responding.

If we fly off the handle or get brusque with others we’re not self aware. We’re reacting.

The result is more favorable when we respond. We don’t damage relationships and we build trust.

2. Listening expertise

When others are speaking, people who have strong EI listen intently. They don’t think about how to react.

Instead, they try to understand what the other person is saying and feeling – before they respond – and then they acknowledge the person’s feelings.

Even if the person is rambling off-topic or complaining about an unsolvable situation, an EI-inspired person will let the person vent.

3. Ability to be aware of emotions of individuals

If we’re aware of the emotions in others, we don’t have to change our exercise program – because we don’t jump to conclusions. We don’t rush to judgment.

Nor do we mirror the negative emotions of angry people. We don’t take things personally. This means we’re not giving away our power to others.

4. Reading the whole environment

A person with strong EI can read the room – the emotions of people at work. Morale is important to read, and so is sensing the collective emotions of employees that can adversely affect the workplace.

Communication can then follow.

5. Response skills

Senior managers who can predict their employees’ attitudes and behaviors are more adroit in dealing with negative situations before it’s too late. They can be proactive to alleviate and improve such situations.

Again, my sense is that EI can be learned and developed. If you believe in the EI concept and its benefits, understand that it takes commitment, discipline and practice.

There are four strategies to improve your EI:

1. Seek input

If you don’t understand a challenge or situation, ask a mentor for insights. If you’re in a disagreement with employees or peers, ask for an explanation.

If you’re being criticized, simply listen and take notes. Don’t get defensive or make excuses. Try to understand the criticism, own it and take corrective measures.

2. Analyze how you affect others

Be aware of your intent, tone of voice and how you negatively affect other people. Unintentionally, people marginalize others.

They don’t understand the gap – what they intend to say but how it hurts others.

3. Freeze your negative emotions

Whenever you’re in an uncomfortable situation, don’t lower yourself to a knee-jerk reaction. Listen. Pause. Think.

4. Learn the art of empathy

Even if you disagree with someone, empathize with a response something like, “I can understand how you feel that way.” Then try to understand the person’s point-of-view.

You’re not prostituting your values. You’re merely acknowledging the person’s feelings. Empathy goes a long way to resolving issues.

Finally, if you want to check your EI level, you can take this EI quiz.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related articles:

Listening Skills to Improve Your Relationships and Business Performance — What counts in communication? Listening skills for discernment and trust. Discerning people are the most successful and listening skills are important for discernment. That goes for athletes and management, alike.

10 Management Attributes for Effective Communication — Communication skills are critical for managers. People with enhanced abilities in communication typically have successful relationships at work and home. Good communicators typically have 10 attributes.

Why Executives Emphasize Communication Training for Employees — Among human resources training priorities, employee communication is often now more important than skills, say many executives. Two-thirds of executives responding to a survey say communication skills are most needed by certain employees.

10 Steps to Manage Conflict for High Performance — For progress, a business needs human interaction for ideas and innovation. Sometimes, argument, debate and conflict prove to be productive catalysts for high performance. But such catalysts can be obstacles to success, too. Here are the simplest ways to manage conflict.

To Win in Project Management, Tap Emotional Intelligence — Automated project-management models might be popular, but they don’t lead to the championship-quality results. Project managers achieve greater success and long-term sustainability by leveraging emotional intelligence. Yes, mastering emotions makes it possible to motivate employees to higher performances.

“Nobody cares how much you know, until they know how much you care.”

-Theodore Roosevelt


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is also a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy of Ambro at www.freedigitalphotos.net

To Win in Project Management, Tap Emotional Intelligence

 
 
Automated project-management models might be popular, but they don’t lead to the championship-quality results.

Project managers achieve greater success and long-term sustainability by leveraging emotional intelligence. Yes, mastering emotions makes it possible to motivate employees to higher performances. There are two types of emotional intelligence. (More on that later.)

Meantime, is emotional intelligence always helpful? No. It depends. Emotional intelligence can have a downside.

ID-10066439 AmbroFor example:

When managers or employees hide their feelings and strategically use their skills for personal gain by manipulating others.

As a result of such political environments, project team members lose their abilities to reason.

Leaders use emotional intelligence — to develop their vision and in management of their teams — for execution of strategies in project management to realize higher performances.

Conversely, typical managers might be capable of developing promising strategies, but they only reach satisfactory results from execution. Why?

They don’t leverage the potential of emotional intelligence in their workplace teams by encouraging open, emotional expression.

Consequently, they don’t motivate their teams to effectively execute strategies for the best outcomes.

Worse, some tend to hire people who aren’t assertive and who are reluctant to tell bosses about looming issues and obstacles to organization success.

Nor do such managers understand their workplace collective emotions — the feelings of their groups of employees.

If new initiatives and projects aren’t popular among employees, the water-cooler gossip leads to a negative group-think which can be quite damaging and can even lead to the downfall of projects.

So, what are the results? The outcomes are tantamount to strategy without execution for average results.

Leaders use emotional intelligence — to develop their vision and in management of their teams — for execution of strategies in project management to realize higher performances.

Steps to greater success

The process starts for managers by learning more about emotional intelligence. After studying it, they follow with a self-examination of their communication practices and body language — checking to see if they create barriers between themselves and their teams.

Managers can then increase their chances for success in their visions — improving the culture’s climate — by inspiring an environment of open communication.

Naturally, employee freedom of emotional expression must neither offend the sensitivities of team members nor hurt the welfare of the organization.

However, if managers better understand their own emotional intelligence and their teams’ collective emotions and encourage freedom in emotional expression, they’ll improve their odds of identifying and managing negative emotions for superior results from execution.

Projects can be more successful by identifying and communicating with appropriate emotional values — as a complement to automated project-management models.

From the Coach’s Corner, related content:

6 Types of Ineffective Project Managers — Poor performing project managers generally have one of six traits, according to technology author Phil Simon. Actually, his insights are applicable for any type of manager. Pulling no punches, Mr. Simon’s commentary, “Bad Project Managers: 6 Archetypes,” was published in InformationWeek. 

Leadership and Planning Tips for Successful Project Management — In truth, projects fail because they’re not managed. Yes, there are varying degrees, but in reality they’re either managed or they’re not. The project manager must possess 11 leadership attributes to manage the team, stay on track and keep within budget. 

4 Ways to Solve 6 Uncertainties in Project Management —  Seemingly negative surprises have often been perceived as insurmountable, but that’s not always the situation in project management. By innovatively spotting opportunities in uncertainties, the results often exceed initial expectations in budgeting, quality and scheduling. That’s the lesson according to an academic report. 

How to Grow Your EI for Leadership Success — Emotional intelligence (EI) is important for communication and leadership. A person who has EI is able to evaluate, understand, and control emotions.

To Sell Ideas to Senior Executives, Tap into Their Emotions — If you want to persuade a senior executive, polish your soft skills. Whether you’re trying to sell your ideas to your CEO or you’re trying to sell to a key decision maker at another company, big data is important. But data isn’t the most important factor in persuading senior executives.

“When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion.”

 -Dale Carnegie

 
 

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry. 

 
 
 
 
Photo courtesy or Ambro at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.