11 Tips to Succeed in Your Career with Effective Writing



Whether you want to write as an author like Mark Twain or to generate content to market your business, effective writing requires two attributes.

They are dedication and passion.

To enhance your attributes, here are 11 tips:

1. Check your motives. Your immediate objective isn’t  about making money or becoming famous.

Your writing should benefit your readers either for entertainment or for information. And in the end, you’ll enrich your life.

2. You should create content on a daily basis — even if you’re uninspired or tired — but it’s your job.

If you’re an author, write every day. If you’re a blogger, develop an editorial calendar and write often and not up against deadlines.

Don’t let it become a dreary occupation.

3. Be consistent in your style. If you’re a business or academic writer, you’re likely to be more effective as a passive writer.

But if you’re writing the next great novel, throw caution to the wind.

4. Avoid boring, long phrases and sentences. Write with an economy of words. Be descriptive, but eliminate unnecessary words. To maintain your readers’ interest, write short sentences.

5. Know your audience. If you’re writing for academia or business, grammar is important. If not, conversational English should be your goal. Did you ever notice that broadcast journalists write for the ear in order to be easily understood? Yes, they write news copy at a junior high or high-school level.

6. Know that great writers are voracious readers. You won’t add to your readers’ experience, if you’re not well-read. Great writers are often self-taught. You learn by reading.

7. Don’t procrastinate or let fear dictate your approach. As an acronym, FEAR, stands for “frantic effort to avoid responsibility.” Write regularly. Just do it. Chip away.

8. Get rest, recreation, and exercise. You’ll clear your head and feel better with fresh air.

9. Have a support system. If you’re in a healthy relationship, great. You won’t be distracted.

10. Create the right environment for productive writing. Get rid of any distractions so you can focus.

11. Recheck and edit your work. Read it aloud to yourself to catch errors. If you have someone whom you can ask to read your writing, do it. You might get help regarding the structure of your writing or to help you clarify your points.

From the Coach’s Corner, more writing tips:

11 Best Practices to Profit from Writing a Business White Paper — When you’re writing a case study for a client or you’re commissioned to write a white paper – there are best practices — then, there are only attempts at shameless promotion of a biased idea. You’ll want readers to perceive the former.

25 Best Practices for Better Business Writing — If you want to accelerate your career or turbo-charge your business, one of your priorities should be good communication. Good writing is necessary in a myriad of ways, including letters, advertising copy and presentations.

Don’t Know How to Write? Here Are 7 Tips to Write Well — So you think you don’t know how to write? You have more potential than you think. However, the more important need you have for writing, the odds are higher that you either freeze from writer’s block or that you’re uncertain about grammar. Don’t let that stop you.

Secrets for Attracting, Keeping Readers on Your Blog — Content marketing is a valuable tool, but only if you observe best practices in substance and style – writing the most intriguing headlines and most relevant copy. Attracting readers and keeping them on your blog or site means you must capitalize on your strengths and write for the benefit your Internet readers.

PR Is Nearly 90% More Valuable Than Content Marketing — Study — A Bill Gates’ quote is famous: “If I was down to my last dollar, I’d spend it on public relations.” Certainly, there’s validity for his philosophy. Even if you go to the competing Google News, you’ll typically find 50 million results for the key word, Microsoft.

“Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.”

-Benjamin Franklin


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Your Career: 10 Tips for Writing Better Business E-mails



Do you want to be a standout as a business e-mail writer? To enhance your career, it’s important to write effective e-mails and memos.

You don’t have to be an English major to write effectively.

This article is designed to cover the most salient points of better e-mail writing. You are encouraged to research any of the following topics if you need a further explanation.

cyber imagerymajestic www.freedigitalphotos.netUse these basic tips:

1. Review your goal. What do you want to accomplish? Your writing should be focused. If you want someone to act, you need a call for action.

2. Don’t leave the recipients guessing. Summarize your objective in the first paragraph. Include the topic in the subject line. In this way, busy persons will know instantly why you’re writing to them.

3. Use an economy of words. Most memos and e-mails will be read and more easily understood if you keep them short.  Don’t use unnecessary words. In most sentences you can avoid the use of the word “that.”

Ideal content is a maximum of three short paragraphs — no more than two or three sentences each. If it’s a complex subject, include an attachment.

An example to use an economy of words: Instead of writing “our appointment that we scheduled for January 2nd,” simply write “our January 2nd appointment.”

4. Limit your use of prepositions. Regarding point No. 3 on wordiness, know that prepositions aren’t always necessary. A preposition begins prepositional phrases. It links nouns, phrases and pronouns to other words in a sentence to introduce the preposition’s object.

Don’t insert prepositions following a verb, for example, “where did he go to?” It’s correct to write “where did he go?”

Also, never end a sentence with a preposition, such as “the car has been lost track of.” It’s correct to write “lost track of the car.” Again, prepositions are correctly used in prepositional phrases.

5. Be specific in your adjectives and descriptions. Avoid using vague words or phrases, such as “that is incredible.” Your reader might get the wrong impression.

For example, by using the phrase “that is incredible,” do you mean “that is outstanding” or “that is undesirable?”

6. When plausible, come across as dynamic as possible. Use active verbs. Try to avoid using past tense, such as “she believed” instead of “she believes.”

7. Be authentic in your writing. Avoid using the latest buzz phrases just to be ostentatious or hip.

Over the last several generations in business, succeeding generations have used different phrases as glittering generalities to describe the same concepts. That doesn’t mean, however, you should “dumb down” your writing. A good vocabulary is to be respected.

8. Show maturity by not using exclamation points. They should be rarely, if ever, used in business communications.

9. Be careful in your use of punctuation marks in quotations. For example, commas and periods should be inserted outside the quotation mark. (In case you’re wondering, this portal’s articles are written in journalistic style, which is why punctuations are inside the quotes.)

10. Review your writing before sending an e-mail. Read your content out loud to catch errors. Other than typos, the most frequent errors are missing words.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are more writing tips:

25 Best Practices for Better Business Writing — If you want to accelerate your career or turbo-charge your business, one of your priorities should be good communication. Good writing is necessary in a myriad of ways, including letters, advertising copy and presentations. 

11 Best Practices to Profit from Writing a Business White Paper — When you’re writing a case study for a client or you’re commissioned to write a white paper – there are best practices — then, there are only attempts at shameless promotion of a biased idea.  

Rock in Your Marketing Messages with 5 Writing Tips — In this digital age of consumer overload, words are powerful – if they’re used strategically. The challenge is to help your prospective customers quickly understand your message.  

Secrets for Attracting, Keeping Readers on Your Blog — Content marketing is a valuable tool, but only if you observe best practices in substance and style – writing the most intriguing headlines and most relevant copy.  

“Substitute ‘damn’ every time you’re inclined to write ‘very’; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”

-Mark Twain

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.

Photo courtesy of imagerymajestic at www.freedigitalphotos.net

11 Best Practices to Profit from Writing a Business White Paper



When you’re writing a case study for a client or you’re commissioned to write a white paper — there are best practices — then, there are only attempts at shameless promotion of a biased idea. You’ll want readers to perceive the former.

To write with authority and credibility in the 21st century, it’s important to present conclusions after a structured and well-researched thesis sans the appearance of bias and using aggressive emotional verbiage. That means not pushing emotional buttons with inflammatory rhetoric.

stock images @ www.freedigitalphotos.netDo your best to come across like a book written by Peter Drucker.

In this era of economic upheaval and political chaos, it seems like an opportune time to write a topical paper using acceptable standards and irrefutable logic.

To avoid the run of-the-mill syndrome in a white paper, here are the minimums in best practices:

1. Research by asking lots of open-ended questions. In this way, you’ll learn the whole story about which to write – such as options, challenges, results, benefits and negatives. 

2. Capitalize on time. First, compose your headline – catchier, the better to pique reader interest. This will also help you to stay focused and relevant. Start writing as soon as possible while details are fresh. You’ll also want to be the first to chronicle the subject. 

3. Include full documentation. Add enough details so the reader isn’t left with salient, unanswered questions.That, of course, means hard financial data that lead to efficiency and other results.

4. Use direct quotes. Your paper will be more persuasive with quotes and testimonials of experts and participants.

5. Illustrate with pictures and/or graphs. To maximize visual interest, pictures and graphs are helpful to paint vivid pictures in the minds of the reader.

6. Take the long view. Present a snapshot of the big picture – the question in its entirety. Avoid looking like a writer who can only see what’s at the end of your nose. Your paper should contain interesting, relevant examples – but broad enough with value to satisfy even the most-sophisticated reader.

7. Logically structure your case. Include three sections:

  • The beginning to state the problem
  • The middle with a discussion of the pros and cons leading to reasonable solutions
  • The end summarizing in a conclusion

8. Length. White papers generally consist of 2500 words or more.

9. Proofread your paper. Check for logical arguments and conclusions. Review for errors in grammar and facts. Share with a trusted confidante for a devil’s advocate to challenge your advocacy.

10. Publish in a PDF format. PDFs are easily emailed, if you wish, and they result in less work for the reader so the person can fully appreciate and understand your thesis.

11. Capitalize on your work. Your instincts are important. Assuming the client agrees, target the right readers for your paper and highlight the key elements and values. Use key bullet points or the entire paper as part of sales pitches.

Publish it on your Web site, and be sure to use the right keywords to draw attention. Consider presenting your paper at conferences, or offer to make it available if attendees e-mail a request to you.

And, oh, yes, consider using a sophisticated approach in social media, writing a press release and blogging about it.

Good luck! 

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related resources:

25 Best Practices for Better Business Writing  — If you want to accelerate your career or turbo-charge your business, one of your priorities should be good communication. Good writing is necessary in a myriad of ways, including letters, advertising copy and presentations.

For a Bounce in Revenue, Try Strategic Press ReleasesEver wonder why some companies are always in the news or how they succeed on the Internet? It’s a good bet they have a good PR consultant or have mastered the art of writing press releases.

SEO and Other Strategic Tips for a No.1 Rated Blog — To own your blogging niche, you must understand the evolving process — important basics in search engine optimization (SEO) and other strategies. ips for a No.1 Rated Blog

“Most of our so-called reasoning consists in finding arguments for going on believing as we already do.”
-James Robinson

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is also a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.

Photo courtesy of stockimages www.freedigitalphotos.net

Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.