Marketing – Why Visual Content Works on Facebook, but Hashtags Don’t



Ninety-eight percent of top brands have a Facebook fan page, but Facebook’s hashtags don’t enhance engagement with consumers. That’s one of two salient conclusions from an analysis of top-brand experiences from marketing on Facebook.

What does work is visual content. That’s according to a 2013 Facebook study by Simply Measured, a Seattle social-media measurement company, which issued a press statement.

Sixty percent of the companies post at least once a day.

Twenty percent of their Facebook posts use hashtags. But the companies have discovered visual content with photos result in 95 percent of their engagement with consumers.

Overall, photos posted by top brands average more than 9,400 engagements per post, while video posts average more than 2,500 engagements.

Facebook has made significant changes to benefit brands and users: Redesigning its news feed to improve how visual content is displayed, and introducing clickable hashtags that allow brands to provide additional context with their posts.

Simply Measured saw no measurable change in how hashtags influence engagement.

These posts perform as well as posts without hashtags, suggesting that people are not yet discovering brand posts by their tags.

The study evaluates brands and verticals in the Interbrand 100, identifying key trends and strategies shaping the way companies engage with consumers through social media.

Key findings:

Length of posts matter.

Analysis of more than 500 status updates from the top brands shows that the longer a status update is, the less engagement it typically receives. However, if a status update is too short (less than 50 characters) it may not be long enough to capture viewers’ attention or provide the necessary context to drive engagement.

Not allowing fans to post on walls hinders engagement.

Twenty-nine percent of top brands do not allow users to post on their wall. For these brands, engagement on their page is limited to likes, comments and shares on brand posts, resulting in 15 percent less engagement than brands that do allow user posts.

However, brands that don’t allow user posts have 71 percent more fans.

Top brands take different approaches.

The top 10 most engaging brands average 19.8 million fans (more than twice the 7.9 million brand average) and average 2.5 posts per day. A large variance exists in the number of times brands post, demonstrating the different approaches brands take to serving content.

Facebook, MTV and Coca-Cola top the list.

Facebook claims the top spot with 93 million fans, followed by Coca-Cola and MTV with 68.6 million and 45.8 million fans, respectively. When it comes to overall engagement, only MTV made the leader list, following behind Disney, Ferrari and Intel.

Automotive brands dominate the top 10.

Automotive brands are taking advantage of their fans passion for high quality car photos, posting more frequently than other brands and receiving nearly twice the Interbrand average per post engagement. Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Harley-Davidson and Audi USA all rank among the top 10 in engagement.

To analyze any Facebook profile for free, visit: http://simplymeasured.com/freebies. Simply Measured also offers free reports to measure your success on Twitter, YouTube, Google+ and other platforms.

From the Coach’s Corner, more social media tips:

Government Warns Business in Ruling Against Costco on Social Media Policy — Many companies encourage their employees to promote their offerings and services on social media. But beware, it was bound to happen: The trend has caught the attention of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), which can dictate your social media policy.

How Small Businesses Can Profit from Cyber Strategies Yes, it’s become important for small businesses to capitalize on cyber strategies for profit. Small and even regional retailers should be cognizant of three realities.

UCLA Psychologists Tell What Triggers People to Share on Social Media – Buzz. Marketers, senior managers, business owners, and consultants crave it for revenue. Career-minded individuals engaged in self-promotion also want it. Another term for buzz is the “salesperson effect.” For the first time, we learn how ideas are spread, what messages go viral on social media, and how to predict it.

How Twitter Levels the Playing Field for Small Cap Companies – Good news for venture capitalists and entrepreneurs who are known to kvetch that that their companies fall below the radar screen of Wall Street analysts and the media.

“For a truly effective social campaign, a brand needs to embrace the first principles of marketing, which involves brand definition and consistent storytelling.”

-Simon Mainwaring


__________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy Ambro at www.freedigitalphotos.net 

Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.