36 Tips: Develop Confidence to Win an Office Tug of War


When nice people lose in office politics, it isn’t because their opponents are stronger. They lose because they unknowingly give away their power.



For people lacking in self confidence, winning a tug of war at the office is easier said than done.

One sign is whether you’re winning hearts and minds at work. For instance, in the event of disagreements, are you able to persuade others?

If you can’t persuade others even when you provide irrefutable facts, of course, you might be dealing with extremely obstinate people.

It’s also possible you’re not making your case well and going about it unproductively.

To use an analogy: If you’re in Los Angeles and really want to arrive in New York, don’t get in your car and drive south to Mexico.

So use a road map to get you where you want to go.

Candidly, as a young man long before I became a business-performance consultant, my career took off when I became a better employee.

Before I knew it, I earned the right to manage others.

How? Along the way, I sought mentors and used road maps for my career.

For confidence in an office tug of war, here are ground rules for a road map:

  1. Your first job is to find a mentor. Look for someone who is successful in ways you’re not. Don’t be shy about approaching someone. Chances are a prospective mentor will readily accept your request.
  2. Don’t take such a mentor relationship for granted. When you start being successful, your relationship is not finished. As Peter Drucker said, “Arrogance is being proud of ignorance.” You’re likely to learn even more from an astute mentor. Only if the person becomes too busy or your career takes a dramatic turn, you might need to find a different mentor.
  3. Make your bosses look good. Respect their positions and be loyal. Without kissing up to your bosses, look for ways to be supportive and helpful. Executives understand the value of a loyal employee.
  4. Don’t be a people-pleaser. In your interactions with others just to get along with them, avoid all gossip. Don’t participate in the spreading of rumors. Be honest and direct. You’ll develop a more positive image, and you’ll become the go-to person in the eyes of your bosses and co-workers.
  5. Extend your comfort zone. Reach out to others. That means interfacing with people in other departments as the first step in building new business relationships.
  6. Learn the landscape. Know who is truly your friend and who is your adversary. In this way, you’ll never deceive or offend the wrong people.
  7. Be loyal to your allies. Developing alliances is a two-way street. You’ll be able to rely on others, if they feel they can rely on you.
  8. Learn how to use your enemies. As the adage goes, “Keep your friends close, but keep your enemies closer.” Be sociable. Learn to probe artfully. Develop and maintain a dialogue with your enemies. You’re more likely to know what they’re thinking, and to win them to your point-of-view at crucial times.
  9. Don’t say more than necessary. Stand out by using the tool of silence. The more you say the more common and less powerful you appear to be. And you’re also likely to say something foolish, which will hurt your cause.
  10. In the heat of battle, know how to keep information close to your vest. Never reveal more than you really have to say. To use a baseball analogy, successful pitchers don’t let the batters what type of pitch is next. Don’t warn your adversaries by telegraphing your next moves.
  11. Manage your reputation. Guard it. Don’t become vulnerable. As in all sports, be defensive – protect your turf. A strong reputation is your foundation for power.
  12. In adversity, don’t let your environment define you. That means not letting others brand you. Be your own master. Re-engineer yourself, if necessary.
  13. Learn self-marketing techniques. First impressions are lasting impressions. You are judged by appearances. Be dignified in your self-promotion with charity work or working on committees. Don’t make the mistake of generating too much exposure. If you’re omnipresent, you’ll dilute your image.
  14. Never dirty your hands. Save your ammunition for important causes. Even if others agree with you on a political issue, whenever possible let them do the dirty job. If complaints are necessary to upper management, it’s better if you let others do it.
  15. Let opponents come to you. You’ll maintain your leverage of power, if adversaries feel they have to approach you first. In negotiations, usually the first person to speak eventually loses.
  16. Avoid arguments, win via your actions. The momentary satisfaction from winning a bitter disagreement isn’t worth it. Spoken words are sometimes more dangerous than actions. You’ll encounter resentments, which will last for a long time if not forever. It also demonstrates more power.
  17. Avoid negative or hapless people. It’s one thing to help others, but it’s another to get lost in someone else’s doldrums. They usually create their own misfortune with unproductive attitudes and behavior.
  18. Be gracious. Suspicious people will be won over by if you use gestures of generosity and honesty.
  19. When you need help from others, be a good salesperson. Don’t beg. Remember all decisions are based on emotion. People will respond favorably to you if they see a benefit for their best self interests.
  20. In a mammoth struggle, win decisively. Don’t leave anything undone. Don’t let fires smolder. Like a smoldering ashes in a fire, your enemy can recover.
  21. Cultivate an image of unpredictability. If your attitudes and behaviors are too familiar, your opponents will sense you’re vulnerability.
  22. Don’t isolate yourself. Be accessible. Mingle and communicate regularly with your allies. A crowd of friends help shield you.
  23. Don’t be harried in dealing with others. Maintain your independence. Don’t rush to take sides in disagreements.
  24. Know your adversaries, and allow them to be arrogant. Understand their weaknesses while appearing to be detached. Be a Columbo, the under-estimated TV character played by Peter Falk, who shrewdly solved the crimes.
  25. Expect to win, but surrender when you think you might experience defeat. The trick is to analyze early enough to save face. Never fight because of pride. Instead, surrender. It’s a tool of power when used right.
  26. If you’re uncertain about which approach to use, be conservative until you’re ready to be bold. Before acting, do a mini-SWOT analysis of your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Then act with bold. Virgil had it right, “Fortune favors the bold.”
  27. As in track, plan to finish the race. A SWOT analysis will help you plan to victory. Think far ahead. You’ll be perceived as a visionary.
  28. Act as if … that means in all things appear to be natural and acting with ease. Act with confidence. Hold your head high and carry yourself well. If you act and speak with conviction, others will be convinced of your strength. You’ll enhance your image by appearing to function effortlessly without panic. 
  29. Slower motion gets you there faster. Never act like you’re in a hurry. Walk slowly and speak with impeccable diction. Patience is a virtue so develop a sense of good timing. Be sure you’re right before acting and pause when the timing isn’t good.
  30. Stay calm and within yourself. Anger is never OK. Keep your adversaries at bay by staying calm.
  31. Be leery of free deals. Don’t take shortcuts. Be free of guilt and deceit by always paying your own way. Actually, by being generous, it will convey an image of authority and credibility.
  32. Don’t try to succeed or overshadow a great personality. Nothing is ever as good as the original. You’ll be overlooked and will lose your identity you’ve worked hard to build.
  33. Attack the source of trouble. Don’t get sidetracked like the fictional character, Don Quixote, who was famous for jousting at imaginary windmills. Problems are usually caused by one person. Attack the actual cause so problems don’t multiply.
  34. Carefully, be an astute advocate for change. Don’t overwhelm everyone around you by trying to innovate or change everything too quickly. You’ll appear to be power hungry. Make changes slowly. Be sure they appear to be necessary and moderate transformations.
  35. Be approachable and occasionally self effacing. People respond more favorably to people who are human – who aren’t error-free. They like people who can laugh at themselves. Such a strategy will prevent your associates from thinking your narcissistic.
  36. In ordeals, don’t over-reach. You must know when you’ve earned enough of a victory. Understand when it’s important to stop.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are relevant strategies:

18 Tips for Productive Behavior to Win in Office Politics — Most people troubled by office politics are too focused on the behavior of their adversaries. Stop giving away your personal power. Don’t think or act like a victim. Here are 18 valuable tips to win in office politics.

Make More Friends at the Office with 6 Etiquette Tips — In many companies, good etiquette is nonexistent and office co-workers fail to make friends of one another. Lack of trust and turmoil is seemingly evident everywhere. You don’t have to like everyone, but it’s best to be respectful, and assertive versus aggressive. That makes for good office relationships.

Listening Skills to Improve Your Relationships and Business Performance — What counts in communication? Listening skills for discernment and trust. Discerning people are the most successful and listening skills are important for discernment. That goes for athletes and management, alike.

11 Tips for a Better Relationship with Your Boss — Whether you want a happier work environment or lay the groundwork for a raise, promotion or transfer, you must create opportunities for success. That includes, of course, being on good terms with your boss and often your boss’s boss.

5 Personality Traits Why Managers Are Promoted into Leadership — In selecting candidates for leadership, the risks can be great for both the company and managers in lost time, effort and money. So when deciding which of their corporate managers should be promoted into a leadership positions, naturally, companies don’t want any surprises.

“You can’t just play around with all those big cats – you’ve got to take somebody on.”

-Maya Angelou 


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is also a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Image courtesy of jesadaphorn at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Make More Friends at the Office with 6 Etiquette Tips



In many companies, good etiquette is nonexistent and office co-workers fail to make friends of one another. Lack of trust and turmoil is seemingly evident everywhere.

Doesn’t it make sense to get along with your coworkers?

For five days a week, you spend more than a third of your time at the office. You don’t have to like everyone, but it’s best to be respectful, and assertive versus aggressive. That makes for good office relationships.

business woman ID-100109224There are ample opportunities for agreements and disagreements.

After all, it’s not uncommon for people to disagree.

For career success, your image is important.

To keep your reputation intact, it’s best to be known for cooperation, fun and mutual support.

For best communication, common courtesy is important.

If you’re good at making friends, chances are you’re influential.

To make more friends at the office, here are six etiquette tips:

1. You don’t have to have the last say.

Know-it-all people are annoying – really annoying. So don’t always act as if you have to have the last say.

If you have a different opinion than someone else, you don’t have to always be right. People are unpopular in part because they are thin-skinned and get defensive. In matters of disagreement, you can choose to disagree and let it go.

A typical good response: “Hmm. I didn’t see it that way.”

When you make a mistake, it’s also unproductive to deny your role or to try to blame somebody else. Admit your mistake, apologize and devise a solution. That’s what respected people do.

2. Don’t criticize others publicly.

If you have a legitimate criticism of a co-worker, discuss it privately. No one likes a big mouth or a snitch.

You can compete with your peers, which is common especially in sales or among workers competing for a promotion or raise. But it can be a friendly competition.

When a co-worker is successful, be gracious with your congratulations. Don’t change the subject back to you. You will have ample opportunity at the right occasion for your self-promotion.

Otherwise, the person will notice your puffery and take offense. Being happy at someone else’s success is a hallmark of maturity.

3. Be a good listener.

Good conversationalists are good listeners. You will actually enhance your chances at influencing others if are a good listener.

An unfortunate common trait of a bad conversationalist is the use of the phrase, “Yeah, but…” People who react or interrupt others with “yeah, but” are seen as negative.

“Confidence is the easiest thing to lose and the hardest thing to get back.”

-Drew Stanton

It’s no secret that the best salespeople or leaders ask open-ended questions and then listen carefully to the answers. They let people talk without interruption.

An open-ended question differs from a close-ended question. An open-ended question prompts the person to talk and explain. A close-ended question will only get you a close-ended answer, a “yes” or a “no.”

4. Don’t be a people-pleaser in making commitments.

Showing a community spirit is to be encouraged. It’s great if you’re empathetic about people less fortunate than you.

You’re likely to be asked to help others, especially in what I call the stewardship season – the holidays in the fourth quarter. However, don’t make the mistake of over-committing. Carefully select what and whom you will help. If you have to decline to help, you can say no nicely.

5. Avoid water-cooler gossip.

Trustworthy people avoid water-cooler gossip. Conversely, negative people who criticize others aren’t to be trusted – they will be sarcastic about you when you’re back is turned.

Be inspiring by aspiring – to be trustworthy.

Remember the adage: “What goes around comes around.”

6. Avoid profanity.

People who swear a lot do so because they’re negative. Civility counts a lot at the office. In 90 percent of your conversations, there opportunities to use words, such as “thank you,” “please” and “you might wish to consider.”

Oh, and by the way, the above tips are common techniques used by confident professionals – who are promotable people. These are some of the characteristics of people who succeed as the best managers and even leaders.

So, if you want to get ahead, start using these techniques.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related tips:

Tips for Dining Etiquette with Your Boss or Anchor Client – Whatever the important business occasion, it’s helpful to hold your meeting away from the tense hustle and bustle of a corporate setting. The right ambience for deal making is often an opulent restaurant with sumptuous food. That’s been my preference.

18 Tips for Productive Behavior to Win in Office Politics – Most people troubled by office politics are too focused on the behavior of their adversaries. Stop giving away your personal power. Don’t think or act like a victim. Here are 18 valuable tips to win in office politics.

Hate Your Job but Can’t Quit? How to Enjoy it in the Meantime — If you hate your job but can’t quit because you need the money, you’re not powerless. There are ways to enjoy your work and improve your situation.

11 Tips for a Better Relationship with Your Boss — Whether you want a happier work environment or lay the groundwork for a raise, promotion or transfer, you must create opportunities for success. That includes, of course, being on good terms with your boss and often your boss’s boss.

13 Tips on Coping with Change at Work – Conquer Your Fears — In this economy, it seems normal to fear losing your job. Plus, budget cuts, hiring freezes, revised job descriptions and getting a new boss can all be unnerving. Other changes can be sources of fear, such as fear of failure in new responsibilities, fear of looking obtuse, fear of an alcoholic coworker, fear of the unknown and fear of success.

“Confidence is the easiest thing to lose and the hardest thing to get back.”

-Drew Stanton

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is also a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.


Praying for a Job? Key Questions to Ask Interviewers



Employers prefer inquisitive applicants. When applicants ask questions, it shows their interest in a company as well as their communication abilities, especially if they ask the right questions.

Actually, there are two benefits if you ask the right questions in a job interview.

Firstly, you shine compared to your competing job seekers. Secondly, you get the right information to make the best decision.

ID-10091541For interviewing success, it’s best if you know how to differentiate yourself. If you’ve ever accepted an offer for the wrong job, you know it’s a pain.

Either way, it’s in your best interest to learn more about the company and the position before accepting a job offer.

Chances are you’ll be interviewed by more than one person. When in doubt, ask them each the same questions so you can compare their answers.

Here are key questions to ask:

1. What have former employees done to be successful in this job?

You’ll probably learn important points. For instance, you’ll learn the expectations of the company.

Moreover, you’ll learn something about the company’s culture. You might also learn how and why the previous person succeeded or failed.

2. How has the job evolved?

More than likely, you’ll learn whether it’s a dead-end position. If you’re not ambitious, OK. But if you’re ambitious, you’ll want to know if it’s a position offering potential — a catalyst for professional growth and promotions within the company.

For interviewing success, it’s best if you know how to differentiate yourself.

3. In the next three months, what are the priorities for this position?

Obviously, you’ll discover on what you’ll need to focus to get a good start. As a new employee, it’s important to make a great initial impression and on what you’ll need to accomplish.

If the interviewer paints a comprehensive picture of expectations, you’ll be able to gauge whether the job would be the right fit for you. If you’re a high achiever, OK. On the other hand, if the employer has too many expectations, you’ll readily see a red flag.

4. What do you think are the biggest challenges for this job?

You’ll get a quick dose of reality. Hopefully, you’ll sense transparency. If the interviewer paints a utopian picture – the job is a cake walk – you’ll want to be very careful about accepting an offer. Few jobs are that easy in this economy.

Also, a lot depends on your professional goals. For example, if you’re trying to work your way up your career ladder, you might be disappointed if the answer indicates you’ll get stuck working awful hours or mundane duties.

If you’re a manager, you might be told you’ll be given all the tools to succeed or you might be expected to accomplish the impossible with poor resources.

5. If I were to be offered the position, how would I be working with my manager?

The supervisor’s style will be revealed to you. This means, you’ll learn how the company treats its employees.  You might not like to be given marching orders all day long. You might prefer a more collegial, collaborative style.

You’ll find out the company’s reasons for its preferred management style and its culture. Either way, you’ll see if you’d be happy.

6. What do employees appreciate the most about working for the company?

If the interviewer hesitates in answering the question or has difficulty, it’s likely you won’t enjoy working there. Conversely, if you’re told the company provides great benefits, revenue sharing or bonuses, you’re getting a green light.

7. If you’re interviewing for a manager’s position, ask: What are the qualities of successful managers?

If the person can’t give you success stories, you’ll learn whether it’s a dynamic company, Otherwise, you’ll get a positive answer and an idea of what the company appreciates in a manager.

8. Do you have any reservations about my qualifications?

Employers like to hire people who are confident and communicative. Such a question demonstrates your self confidence and your openness to be coached, which is an indication of your soft skills.

If the person mentions any concerns, listen intently. Be direct and answer the questions as adroitly as you can. If you’re successful in overcoming any concerns, congratulations. If not, it’s a great learning experience for your next job application.

Either way, make sure you are prepared with a great elevator pitch.

From the Coach’s Corner, here are more career tips:

Career Advice — An Alternative to Applying for Jobs Online — As a job-hunter you know that a significant number of companies, nonprofits and public-sector agencies use an online tracking system to accept applications and screen out applicants. It cuts down on their paper work and saves them time.

7 Tips to Tweet Your Way to a Great New Job – Seriously — Surprise! If you play it smart you can take advantage of the 500 million Twitter account holders to get a new job or career. Really, it’s true.

Job Hunting? Tips to Land Your Dream Job with Style, Substance — Yes, the competition for jobs is ferocious. Here are proven tips to be hired for your dream job.

Increase Your Job Chances if You Have to Interview on the Phone — Face time, of course, is best if you’re interviewing for a job. However, headhunters and many companies schedule introductory telephone interviews. Pat yourself on the back. Even if it’s not an in-person meeting, a telephone interview is a good omen.

7 Steps to Become Great at Thinking on Your Feet — Have you ever been at a loss for words? For example, when asked a question, have you been tongue tied in a sales presentation, while speaking at an event, in negotiations, during an interview or a staff meeting? Getting tongue-tied is not a fun experience.

Let your faith be bigger than your fear. 


 __________

Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is also a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.




Photo by imagerymajestic at www.freedigitalphotos.net


11 Tips to Succeed in Your Career with Effective Writing



Whether you want to write as an author like Mark Twain or to generate content to market your business, effective writing requires two attributes.

They are dedication and passion.

To enhance your attributes, here are 11 tips:

1. Check your motives. Your immediate objective isn’t  about making money or becoming famous.

Your writing should benefit your readers either for entertainment or for information. And in the end, you’ll enrich your life.

2. You should create content on a daily basis — even if you’re uninspired or tired — but it’s your job.

If you’re an author, write every day. If you’re a blogger, develop an editorial calendar and write often and not up against deadlines.

Don’t let it become a dreary occupation.

3. Be consistent in your style. If you’re a business or academic writer, you’re likely to be more effective as a passive writer.

But if you’re writing the next great novel, throw caution to the wind.

4. Avoid boring, long phrases and sentences. Write with an economy of words. Be descriptive, but eliminate unnecessary words. To maintain your readers’ interest, write short sentences.

5. Know your audience. If you’re writing for academia or business, grammar is important. If not, conversational English should be your goal. Did you ever notice that broadcast journalists write for the ear in order to be easily understood? Yes, they write news copy at a junior high or high-school level.

6. Know that great writers are voracious readers. You won’t add to your readers’ experience, if you’re not well-read. Great writers are often self-taught. You learn by reading.

7. Don’t procrastinate or let fear dictate your approach. As an acronym, FEAR, stands for “frantic effort to avoid responsibility.” Write regularly. Just do it. Chip away.

8. Get rest, recreation, and exercise. You’ll clear your head and feel better with fresh air.

9. Have a support system. If you’re in a healthy relationship, great. You won’t be distracted.

10. Create the right environment for productive writing. Get rid of any distractions so you can focus.

11. Recheck and edit your work. Read it aloud to yourself to catch errors. If you have someone whom you can ask to read your writing, do it. You might get help regarding the structure of your writing or to help you clarify your points.

From the Coach’s Corner, more writing tips:

11 Best Practices to Profit from Writing a Business White Paper — When you’re writing a case study for a client or you’re commissioned to write a white paper – there are best practices — then, there are only attempts at shameless promotion of a biased idea. You’ll want readers to perceive the former.

25 Best Practices for Better Business Writing — If you want to accelerate your career or turbo-charge your business, one of your priorities should be good communication. Good writing is necessary in a myriad of ways, including letters, advertising copy and presentations.

Don’t Know How to Write? Here Are 7 Tips to Write Well — So you think you don’t know how to write? You have more potential than you think. However, the more important need you have for writing, the odds are higher that you either freeze from writer’s block or that you’re uncertain about grammar. Don’t let that stop you.

Secrets for Attracting, Keeping Readers on Your Blog — Content marketing is a valuable tool, but only if you observe best practices in substance and style – writing the most intriguing headlines and most relevant copy. Attracting readers and keeping them on your blog or site means you must capitalize on your strengths and write for the benefit your Internet readers.

PR Is Nearly 90% More Valuable Than Content Marketing — Study — A Bill Gates’ quote is famous: “If I was down to my last dollar, I’d spend it on public relations.” Certainly, there’s validity for his philosophy. Even if you go to the competing Google News, you’ll typically find 50 million results for the key word, Microsoft.

“Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.”

-Benjamin Franklin


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Guidelines for an Effective CV to Land Your Ideal Job



If you’re pursuing a career in academia or research, you know a curriculum vitae (CV) is a basic requirement to get consideration for a career position.

It’s also applicable when applying for fellowships or grants.

ID-10044310 ambroA CV contains more details than a resume, which is normally only one or two pages.

The trick is to develop an effective CV to influence decision-makers to give you the job you seek.

For optimal results, this article shows you what to include in your CV and how to write it.

If you’re a novice, it will also give you ideas for your career success.

It will be an omen on what you need to be focusing in the future to build your credentials.

While comprehensive with several tips, they basically comprise two basic recommendations in substance and style.

You need to know what to include in your CV and how to write it.

1. What to include:

Style and Format. Use a simple font such as Arial, Calibri or Times New Roman. Don’t get too cute.

There are various ways to organize your CV, but consistency is important. The content in each section of your CV should be uniform with the others.

In describing your accomplishments in each position, the layout should resemble the others. Hold the readers’ interest by using bulleted lists wherever feasible.

Ethics and accuracy. Be sure of your facts. Check and re-check your grammar, tense, and spelling. Ask a knowledgeable person to proofread your CV with a critical eye and act as a devil’s advocate — to thoroughly scour each facet searching for errors.

Content information. Your name and contact information should be inserted at the top. In the U.S., do not include personal information such as your birth date and gender. It might be OK in some other countries.

Education. List the institutions you attended, the dates and degrees you earned.

Honors and Awards. Include any fellowships, scholarships, awards, and memberships.

Dissertation and thesis. Mention your dissertation title and thesis. Include a description and the name of your advisor.

Experience — Research. Specify your experience with full details. If your research was published, mention where.

Experience — Work. Include your work experience — academic and non-academic, if it’s applicable. Show the employer, position, dates, responsibilities and accomplishments.

Experience — Teaching. Specify your teaching positions. That includes the school and course, and any other germane information.

Relevant skills. Perhaps you have additional skills to include — for instance, administrative, computer or fluency in languages.

Presentations and publications. Mention what you’re currently doing. That would include anything you’ve contributed — written and co-written. List your presentations at conferences — the name of your paper, the conference name, date and location.

Professional association memberships. If you belong to a professional organization, indicate your affiliation and what you do.

Extracurricular and pro-bono activities. Mention your service and volunteer work. Include any other miscellaneous information that seems appropriate.

Professional references. Include at least three references. Specify the contact information for associates who agree to be a reference.

Now that you know what to include, it’s important to consider your self-marketing — how to write a CV to enhance your chances.

2. How to write it:

Emphasize the results of your work. Every decision-maker will subconsciously ask the “so what?” question or the acronym, “WIIFM — what’s in it for me.” Prospective employers aren’t interested in a mere job description in your CV and cover letter.

For example, when you mention an employment responsibility, explain the benefits — the strong results you delivered for your employer. Your results must be relevant to the position.

Remember the meaning of the acronym — STAR — for situation, task, action and result.

Use forceful verbs. You’ll have a more powerful CV, if you use forceful verbs. For instance, “identified and targeted new opportunities for growth in grants … which resulted in … “

Keywords. Many employers use screening software, which means you must anticipate and use the right keywords. If you’re not sure about the right keywords, check the ads for positions in your sector. Use the relevant keywords that seem most popular in your CV. Actually, be sure to use the same keywords in your LinkedIn profile and cover letters, too.

Note: This also means you might have to change your job titles to conform to the keyword screening used by recruiters and employers. Usually, this means your title might need to be simplified. That’s another reason to research keywords.

Be brief. Use an economy of words. Don’t be long-winded. If you have a tendency to be verbose, look for ways to be descriptive but concise. True, CVs are longer than resumes. Try to limit your CV to three or four pages.

If you’re a consultant, you’ve had a lot of projects and clients. Don’t list all the details for positions 10 years or more ago. List your work but simply include your title, employer’s name and date.

Be focused. Your CV should be tailored for each job you’re pursuing. Yes, customize your CV and cover letter to address the specific points in the advertisement. Be especially mindful of the job’s “required essential experience and skills.”

From the Coach’s Corner, related job-hunting strategies:

Career Advice — An Alternative to Applying for Jobs Online — As a job-hunter you know that a significant number of companies, nonprofits and public-sector agencies use an online tracking system to accept applications and screen out applicants. It cuts down on their paper work and saves them time.

5 Tips to Shine in Your Online Job Application — To sail through the human resources filtering system, here are five online-application tips: 1. Put social media to work for you. Make certain your social media – Google+, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter – are current, professional and show maturity. Be careful what you publish – always keep in mind your career goals.

Increase Your Job Chances if You Have to Interview on the Phone — Face time, of course, is best if you’re interviewing for a job. However, headhunters and many companies schedule introductory telephone interviews. Pat yourself on the back. Even if it’s not an in-person meeting, a telephone interview is a good omen. The employer already thinks enough of you to schedule a discussion.

Job Hunting? Tips to Land Your Dream Job with Style, Substance — Yes, the competition for jobs is ferocious. Here are proven tips to be hired for your dream job.

Multiple Job Offers? Ask the Right Questions to Win in Your Career  — Suddenly, you’ve got choices — several companies have said “We want to hire you.” Now, what do you do? Here are five strategies for career success.

“One important key to success is self-confidence. An important key to self-confidence is preparation.”

-Arthur Ashe


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Photo courtesy of Ambro at www.freedigitalphotos. net


Top 10 Benefits by Becoming a Great Public Speaker



In this Digital Age, we’re overwhelmed with the content of good and bad messages from a variety of sources. The Internet, e-mails, television, radio, billboards and the telephone — to name a handful sources of communication. And every day, we’re bombarded thousands of times.

So if your goal is to be informative, persuasive or entertaining — it’s an arduous task to communicate by cutting through the clutter of all those sources. In reality, those messages are competitors.

ID-100190806 franky242Therefore, to be appealing to others, public speaking is important.

If you’re not an accomplished public speaker, you might wish to consider learning how to speak effectively.

One way to start is to take courses in public speaking.

Once you learn techniques, then you become great with practice — constantly creating opportunities to speak. (More on that in the Coach’s Corner at the end of this article.)

You’ll reap rewards personally and professionally. That includes profiting from the development of critical-thinking skills, fine-tuning your nonverbal and verbal skills, and overcoming your fears of public speaking.

If you’re ambitious, you’ll become adept in influencing others as a leader and in thought leadership.

Eric Stone is a leading expert in how to improve communication with others, public speaking and performance. He’s a former New York City stage and television actor, who operates Speakers and Artists International, Inc. (www.publicspeakingconnection.com) in Beverly Hills, Calif.

“So much of our everyday interactions depend on the act of speaking,” he says. ” (He’s the source for advice in a very popular article, Public Speaking Tips – for Speeches in Accepting Awards, Honors.)

“Speaking is not just a constitutional right but the means to achieving our ends, forge our paths and discover our purpose,” he adds. “Our most accomplished achievements begin and end with speaking in action.”

You’ll reap rewards personally and professionally. That includes profiting from the development of critical-thinking skills, fine-tuning your nonverbal and verbal skills, and overcoming your fears of public speaking.

So, there are great reasons to become an effective speaker.

Mr. Stone’s top 10 reasons:

1 — Speaking is an access to power. Speaking in action is a doing and possibly the most important messenger of our wishes. Webster describes speaking as the faculty or act of expressing or describing thoughts, feelings or perceptions by the articulation of words. It also says to us that it is the language of a nation. We live and breathe by speech; it is the single most powerful engine of our human existence. We view everything through the interpretation of language in action.

2 — When we don’t speak well, we simply open the door to feeling stupid. We are too often judged and interpreted through what we say and how we say it. It can be an un-cool source of upset for all involved. We don’t look too good either.

3 — Not Speaking well undermines our basic confidence in ourselves as business professionals, entrepreneurs, citizens, members of a community, etc.

4 — When we don’t speak well we automatically lose credibility. Credibility relies on very simple math: do we believe you? Not so much do you know what you know or are you well prepared?

5 — A good speaker gets what he or she wants. There lies the power. Good speaking taps into our hearts, it emotionalizes our hopes and touches us. We love to be dominated by skillful speaking–it’s such a thrill. A good speaker is like a snake charmer. We fall under the spell. So you not only will look good but also be liked better. You will place yourself in a position of control and appeal.

6 — A good leader is a good speaker first and foremost. The higher the stakes the more our communications require strong intentions, resolve and accountability. Speaking, which is a heightened form of expression can be a life-changing experience. One-on-one, to groups or crowds.

7 — A good speaker earns more and gets promoted. I have been a front-seat witness to this phenomenon in the past decade. A surprising number of folks earn more money and get better jobs as a result of being able to use their hard-won public speaking talents.

8 — A good speaker exudes charisma and an aura of success and confidence. We feel such validation when we speak well. The articulation of ideas can actually reach very artistic dimensions.

9 — We do not know ourselves as well until we’ve spoken ourselves well. In my book, it is at the heart of the matter of what it means to experience life fully. Daring to be ourselves through language can be very rewarding; it begins with the willingness to speak and articulate who we are through words. Words paint the world we are intending to manifest! Our entire civilization is built on the naming of things.

10 — It is always a courageous act to speak! At the primitive level, to speak is to show the world we exist and to validate it for ourselves. We begin trafficking in personal power, recognition and opportunity when we have the courage and skills to speak. Underneath the act of speaking is the will to take a stand and affirm our attitudes; it acts as a framework for further assertiveness and confidence.

From the Coach’s Corner, some valuable public-speaking tips:

Communication – You Can Train Yourself to Stop Stressing — It’s OK to be nervous before giving a speech or when you’re entering an important round of negotiations. Feeling pressure is one thing but allowing it to morph into stress and tension is another. When you allow this to happen, in a sense, you’re giving away your personal power, which inhibits your performance.

How to Get More Opportunities as a Guest Speaker — If you’re successful in generating speaking opportunities, you’ll create opportunities for your career. At the least, you’ll be in a position to raise your business profile. Ideally, prospective clients or customers will be in the audience. Count on opportunities to develop centers of influence — people who can refer business to you.

9 Tips to Connect with People after You Make Your Speech — Typically, in making a speech at a public forum, businesspeople hope to get a return on their investment. After all, giving a great speech or serving on a panel before a targeted audience necessitates your valuable time and effort in preparation.

How to Obtain the Most Profit from Speaking Opportunities — It’s one thing to be invited to speak at your industry’s major event. But it’s another to create the right impression for your hosts, your audience and prospective customers or clients. There’s more to it than you might think.

“A good speech should be like a woman’s skirt; long enough to cover the subject and short enough to create interest.” 

-Winston Churchill


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Courtesy of  franky242 at www.freedigitalphotos.net

Why Many College Grads Fail in Their Job Searches



Many college graduates fail in getting a good job because they’re not adequately prepared, according to a survey of job hunters and human resources professionals.

Both college grads and HR pros say higher education inadequately prepares them for the real world, say consulting firm Millennial Branding and career network Beyond.com.

Most of the 2014 study’s 2,978 respondents believe a bachelor’s degree is significant.

Young CoupleHowever, 73 percent of HR pros indicate the schools are only “somewhat preparing” grads. More than a third, 36 percent, said college grads aren’t prepared at all.

Fifty-nine percent of  the job hunters complain that college didn’t prepare them for the career practicalities they’re facing.

The study shows a college education isn’t sufficient by itself. Sixty-five percent of HR respondents said they don’t care where the applicants attend school.

What employers want

“You hire a person, not a resume – college graduates need to take this into account as they prepare for their career,” said Rich Miligram, Beyond.com’s founder and CEO.

“Corporations are looking to make a long term hire, preferably individuals that are flexible and can work well in a team environment. It is important to study a company prior to the interview, show them your passion and present yourself in the best possible light,” he added. “Recent college grads need to remember that there is still one test left – the one-on-one interview.”

Eighty-four percent of HR respondents said applicants need to show a positive attitude.

That includes soft skills — in communication and teamwork.

Forty-three percent of hiring managers said they want candidates who fit nicely with the organization’s culture.

In addition to soft skills, the ability to solve problems and make decisions is critical. That was obvious in a statement released by the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

So, applicants must be able to analyze quantitative data, prioritize work and communicate well.

Why colleges and professors fail

The problem is that universities and professors feel it’s beneath them to include soft skills in their curricula. That’s because many educators lack real-world experiences themselves.

Some professors, however, do try. In my undergraduate experience, one professor was also a newspaper reporter and I was offered a job in my junior year. But I didn’t want a newspaper career. Broadcast journalism was the reason I invested in an education.

In my job application efforts, I was required to submit a resume. I was not able to get any professors’ help in developing a good resume. They didn’t even understand the process. I had to go outside of college to learn about it.

As a broadcast-journalism grad, a professor did his best to help me get a job when I needed a video-audition tape. He helped me record a terrific video tape. A problem arose when televisions stations weren’t able to view the tape — the professor used a system not used in the real world of TV news.

As a guest lecturer in business classes, I’ve witnessed the same pattern over and over again. So, after college, work to continue your real-world education.

From the Coach’s Corner, more career tips:

Career Advice for College Grads Facing a Firewall — Lessons in the Disparity between Expectations and Reality   Are university graduates overly optimistic about their career options? Yes. Apparently, they have mistaken perceptions. Worse, a major consulting firm is seemingly contributing to the problem. Increasingly, new college graduates are bewildered why they’re under-employed, according to research by Accenture in 2014.

Career Advice — An Alternative to Applying for Jobs Online — As a job-hunter you know that a significant number of companies, nonprofits and public-sector agencies use an online tracking system to accept applications and screen out applicants. It cuts down on their paper work and saves them time.

8 Tips to Boost Your Career with Shameless Self-Promotion — Some of the best tips ever given to me – at a pivotal point in my career – were given to me in the 1980s by one of the nation’s pioneers in radio and TV.

With a Mentor, You Won’t be Alone in Making Career Decisions — You don’t have to be alone in making career decisions. No matter what you do for a living, there’s one investment on which you can count to improve your career. Plus, it won’t cost you any money. Huh? Yes, you can get a mentor.

Job Hunting? Tips to Land Your Dream Job with Style, Substance — Yes, the competition for jobs is ferocious. Here are proven tips to be hired for your dream job.

“If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.”

-Milton Berle

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.

Multiple Job Offers? Ask the Right Questions to Pick the Right Job



The words every job seeker wants to hear: “We want you.”

You’re no exception. You’ve been on a nerve-racking job hunt.

At long last the search is over. Suddenly, you’ve got choices — several companies have said “We want to hire you.”

It’s an enviable situation, but now your real work begins.

woman-467708_1280Yes, you’re winning against your competition.

But remember it’s not all about the money.

If you make the wrong choice, you’ll lose the Big Mo — momentum — invaluable for your career.

So capture the moment — create a balance sheet of questions.

The right answers will help you choose the right job for your career performance without hesitation.

To pick the right job, here are five recommendations:

1. Check out the stability of each employer.

Due diligence will reveal how secure a company is in fiscal issues. What does its financial picture look like?

But there are other questions to ask:

Is it a strong brand? How do customers rate the company? What kind of online reviews does it have?

Do people stay there? Why or why not?

On the other hand, perhaps the company isn’t doing well, but the offer might be just what you need to rock in your career. So ask yourself: “If the company is an underdog in the marketplace — in a turnaround situation — is it a good opportunity for me to shine?”

If you’re a competitive person, it just might be a great opportunity.

My preference was to look for employers who needed my help and wanted it. I loved the challenges. And many years later they are a source of great memories.

2. Research the company’s opportunity for your personal growth.

The bottom-line question: How much does the company value its human capital?

True, no job is perfect. However, some offer room for growth — to advance — opportunities to work your way up.

Does the company pay for training or further education?

Will it be an environment that will allow you to grow professionally?

Does the company tend to promote from within or does it recruit from the outside? Hint: Search the profiles of the company’s employees.

3. Evaluate how the job will affect your personal life.

How will the job affect your work/life balance?

If you have a family, how many of your kids’ little league games or ballerina performances will you miss?

Is there a lot of travel? Too much after-hours work? How would you feel about it?

4. Assess the employer’s culture.

Keep in mind that 33 percent of your day will be spent with these people.

Is the company’s culture compatible for your best interests?

Start at the beginning. Was the interviewer comfortable with whom to chat?

What is the work environment like?

Long before becoming a business-performance consultant, I held a myriad of jobs. I still remember the agitation I felt when a recruiter tried to persuade me to quit college. I also the frustration I felt when pressured to accept an offer that required me to commute 50 miles one-way. Neither culture was for me.

How do you feel about your prospective boss?

5. Pursue your career dreams.

Which offer allows you to stay on your career path?

Is it the right sector? Is it the right location? Is it compatible for your financial goals?

From the Coach’s Corner, here are related tips:

The 22 Dos and Don’ts for Successful Negotiations — No matter what you need to negotiate, there are easy strategies to get anything you want. But you must first remember it’s important to reach a fair compromise – with win-win negotiating skills. You’ll want both parties to feel positive after the negotiation is complete.

To Enhance Your Career, How to Quit Your Job Professionally — OK, so you’re fortunate to have worked several years for the same employer. Perhaps your working conditions have worsened or you’re ready for a vertical move, and you’ve been offered a better job. Congratulations. Before you resign, however, take precautions to make sure your resignation enhances your career, not hurts it.

With a Mentor, You Won’t be Alone in Making Career Decisions — You don’t have to be alone in making career decisions. No matter what you do for a living, there’s one investment on which you can count to improve your career. Plus, it won’t cost you any money. Huh? Yes, you can get a mentor.

7 Steps to Become Great at Thinking on Your Feet — Have you ever been at a loss for words? For example, when asked a question, have you been tongue tied in a sales presentation, while speaking at an event, in negotiations, during an interview or a staff meeting? Getting tongue-tied is not a fun experience.

Career Strategies: How to Get a C-Level Job — If you’re climbing the corporate ladder and have designs on a C-level job, a noted Stanford University professor has some excellent advice.

“Don’t let negativity affect your vision. A lot of people have said harsh things, but I don’t let it affect me. If anything it gives me more enthusiasm and pushes me to do better in my career so I can prove them wrong.”

-Nicole Polizzi


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.






10 Realities if You Want to Succeed as a Leader



So, your hard work has finally paid off. Your employer is rewarding you. After paying your dues and earning your stripes, you’ve reached a leadership position.

But new problems now confront you. While you’re honored to be given the position, you’re learning about your challenges.

Often, they’re overwhelming. There are severe problems to solve and you’re expected to solve them.

MH900422730 young business womanJust remember that events in your past — your experiences — have prepared you for these challenges. Otherwise, you wouldn’t have been selected for the job.

Congratulations, you probably show promise in five areas:

– Strategic visioning

– You push yourself and others to meet goals

– You’ve demonstrated a willingness to take charge and a desire to influence others

– You’re comfortable with change

– You have a willingness to challenge the status quo

But you wouldn’t be human if you’re weren’t a little apprehensive. You can succeed if you rely on your experience and grow into your new position.

At your peril, don’t ignore these 10 realities:

1. You must understand your new role as a leader. Management is an act of control. Leadership is an act of inspiration. There are key differences between managers and leaders.

With effort, managers can also display leadership qualities. Conversely, leaders can definitely be good managers.

In your new role, primarily, you must develop inspirational qualities.

2. You must understand what’s expected of you. If you don’t understand the objectives handed to you, ask questions.

Review the goals. Reflect on them. Prepare yourself mentally to exceed expectations of your boss.

Excellence is a better teacher than mediocrity. The lessons of the ordinary are everywhere. Truly profound and original insights are to be found only in studying the exemplary.

-Warren Bennis

3. You must be good at analysis. You’re expected to solve problems to create opportunities for growth. As a leader, you can’t hide from the issues. You have to accept them.

But to solve problems, you must understand them. You have to query everyone involved and develop critical information.

You must also analyze the strengths and weaknesses of your team members. When you launch a project, you must be confident you’ll achieve success.

4. You must get an accomplished mentor. Find someone who has enjoyed the success that you want and who is willing to share insights. Getting a great mentor is the best investment to sustain your career as a leader.

No matter what sector in which you work, a mentor won’t cost you any money and will pay big dividends.

5. You must mentor others in your sphere. Approach your role as a supervisor with an attitude of service. Start a program of employee engagement. Invest in your employees.

Your return on investment will be trusted relationships and higher performance.

Leaders have antennas to alert them over looming challenges. By effectively mentoring your employees, you’ll be in a better position to motivate them when you’re facing adversity.

6. You must work on continuous self-improvement as a manager. Know your strengths and weaknesses in management. You can’t manage others effectively if you don’t manage your own career.

Take an organized, timely approach in rewarding or punishing your employees. Reward results, not busywork. Rewards should be reserved for impactful results.

Performance reviews are an important part of management. You must also avoid errors in evaluations.

If your employees fail to perform, give them a chance to improve. (If they don’t, remember the 3 key issues to consider when terminating workers.)

If you want to hire an impact person, your hiring process is really important. The wrong hires result in costly turnover — a waste of money and time. Before you start interviewing, the place to start is your screening of resumes.

You need people who are a good fit culturally. Especially, if you’re a small operation, conduct behavioral interviews. Remember all background checks are not equal. So avoid making background screening gaffes.

7. You must be a good communicator. Clear communication will help guarantee teamwork and productivity. You need to explain your vision for the team.

Employees appreciate knowing what you expect, how they’re doing and what’s in it for them.

Set goals about expectations of employee performance, coach your workers, and get feedback. Share your logic in decision-making processes. Explain concepts and principles to your workers, so they can feel involved and valued, and can be pro-active and take ownership of their work.

Employees dislike unproductive meetings. Make sure you hold productive meetings for maximum company performance.

8. You must realize your success depends on the performance of your staff. Embrace collaboration and trust your team’s abilities. Don’t micromanage. If you want maximum profit, consider partnering with your employees.

Employees will be more valuable if they understand what drives profit and improves cash flow. To develop profit drivers, partner with your employees.

Leaders know how to profit from their human capital. Such knowledge is a powerful weapon for high performance in a competitive marketplace. Furthermore, there’s a correlation among excellent sales, happy customers, and high employee morale.

Proverbially speaking, employees are where the tire meets the road. They can solve problems without your involvement and they can offer profitable ideas. So motivate your employees.

9. You must encourage risk taking and innovation. For your short and long-term competitiveness, allow employees to take educated risks but don’t punish them if they don’t succeed.

Every company wants to be successful in this worldwide downturn. But to achieve lofty goals, certainly innovation is the key in our new economy. To become an innovative leader and to participate in turbo-charging the economy, it’s vital to continually evaluating your organization and strategizing for success. That includes becoming a top innovator.

10. You must get socially involved. More companies are aware that employee engagement and morale enable a better customer experience, which leads to higher performance. Friendly employees will stay longer and work harder.

Do a team outing or hold morale-building events on a regular basis. Outside of work, your employees will feel more comfortable.

Just be sure you keep a professional image and don’t get in situations that will compromise your leadership role.

From the Coach’s Corner, related leadership content:

18 Leadership Strategies to Earn Employee Respect — Eighteen strategies to profit from good labor relations, and to leverage the perspective of employees – your company’s human capital.

To Become a Leader, Develop Strategic Planning Skills — What does this mean? It means you must see the big picture — take a long-term approach in anticipating and solving problems.

“Effective leadership is not about making speeches or being liked; leadership is defined by results not attributes.”

-Peter Drucker


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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.





Increase Your Job Chances if You Have to Interview on the Phone



Face time, of course, is best if you’re interviewing for a job. However, headhunters and many companies schedule introductory telephone interviews.

Pat yourself on the back. Even if it’s not an in-person meeting, a telephone interview is a good omen. The employer already thinks enough of you to schedule a discussion.

It’s an opportunity to confidently discuss your background and experience while displaying your personality — your suitability to fit in the company’s culture.

ID-100300363 stockimagesSo, your professionalism is really important — what you say and how you say it, your voice tone and pitch, as well as your conviction and passion for the job and industry.

Here are telephone-interview tips:

– Prepare for the interview. When asked to be interviewed, find out who the interviewer will be and how long the person wants to talk with you.

Review the job description. Take notes so that you’ll be able to mention your successes that address the company’s objectives.

Be ready with your notes, and your cover letter and resume so you can refer to them — whether it’s an interview on the phone (or in-person later).

– Confirm the appointment. If you have the person’s e-mail address, e-mail a confirmation or do so in a telephone message. This will keep you focused. It will show you’re organized.

It will also constitute an opportunity for you — the more positive contacts you have with an employer, the more you increase your odds for success. Typically, five positive contacts will increase your chances.

– Manage the interview process. Avoid extemporaneous interviews. If you’re surprised by a phone call to ask you questions, empathize and thank the person but don’t submit to an interview.

Ask for a later time for a telephone discussion. This will buy you time to prepare — to review your thoughts about the opening, the company, and what you hope to contribute as an employee. 

Think up several questions — preferably five or so — to ask the interviewer. This will help you to shine vs. your competing applicants. 

– Speak well in the interview. You’re likely to be nervous so before answering the phone, take deep breaths. During the discussion, talk from your diaphragm while standing. Yes, stand during the interview. 

This will help you to sound confident, which is a major attraction for good employers. (Just don’t walk around, as your footsteps and heavier breathing will likely be a distraction for the interviewer.)

Take your time in answering questions. If you’re unsure about how to answer a question, ask that it be repeated. This will give you additional time to refer to your materials or to think and answer the question strategically.

– Conclusion steps. When it’s obvious the interview has ended, ask what you can expect in the next steps. Without gushing, sincerely express your appreciation for the interview opportunity and your desire to work in the company’s desired role, if the firm feels you’re suitable.

Handwrite a thank you note. Thank the person, mention a topic or two from the telephone chat that you appreciate, offer your personal branding statement (why you’re a good a fit for their job description-expectations) and a buyer’s remorse statement (how pleased they’ll be after hiring you).

Immediately head to the post office before the last mail dispatch, so that your note goes out right away. Make every attempt to make certain your thank-you note arrives the next day.

From the Coach’s Corner, related content:

7 Steps to Become Great at Thinking on Your Feet — Have you ever been at a loss for words? For example, when asked a question, have you been tongue tied in a sales presentation, while speaking at an event, in negotiations, during an interview or a staff meeting?

HR – Interviewers Give Higher Marks to Applicants Interviewed Early in the Day — Interviewers often mistakenly give higher ratings to job seekers – whom they interview early in the day – at the expense of other applicants.

Is Your Career Stalled? Turbo Charge Your Personal Brand — Perhaps you’re struggling in a job search. You’re ambitious but underemployed, or worse – unemployed. You’re not alone. Millions of professionals are trying to solve similar puzzles.

7 Tips to Tweet Your Way to a Great New Job – Seriously — If you play it smart, you can take advantage of the 500-million Twitter account-holders to get a new job or career. Sure, it’s a daunting task, but the potential for success is terrific.

5 Tips to Shine in Your Online Job Application — As a job-hunter you know that a significant number of companies, nonprofits and public-sector agencies use a tracking system to screen out applicants. It cuts down on their paper work and saves them time. 

Whatever happens, understand that it’s not others who determine what you can do — it’s you.

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Author Terry Corbell has written innumerable online business-enhancement articles, and is a business-performance consultant and profit professional. Click here to see his management services. For a complimentary chat about your business situation or to schedule him as a speaker, consultant or author, please contact Terry.

Photo courtesy of stockimages at www.freedigitalphotos.net

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Seattle business consultant Terry Corbell provides high-performance management services and strategies.